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Full text of "Pilgrim"

THE 

PILGRIM 

PLymoifbh 
Hic£h SchooL 
PLy mouth, Mass 

1 952 




'Dedication 

To Mrs. Miriam Raymond 

in Appreciation for Thirty Years 
of Service to Plymouth High School 

The many gifts she gave to us 

Have filtered through her words and 

deeds, 
Have pierced the coverings of our youth 
To satisfy our lacks and needs: 
A confidence to face the years 
With firm intent and strength of soul, 
To let the gold of righteousness 
Lead us firmly to our goal. — 
To cross the fields, the mighty hills 
With gentle but determined tread, 
To smear no man for effort's gain — 
Erase the words best left unsaid. 
To fill the flowing stream of life 
With impetus and urge to strive, 
To let the plan precede the word, 
And nourish thoughts to make them 

thrive. 
And not to slack when others stop 
But take the places of the weak, 
To waste no time, no word, nor space 
And not to cringe for what we seek. 
We dedicate to such a friend 
Who taught, advised, and paid us heed, — 
A work of words, and place our thanks 
On one so blessed as to lead. 

M. G. 






The Threshold 
Of The Future 



The present is no more than 
that thin edge of time that em- 
braces this moment. Before you 
began to read these words they 
were in the future; when you 
reach the last word printed here 
they will be a part of your past. 

We live forever on the thres- 
hold of the future. But in a broad- 
er and somewhat looser sense your 
Commencement may be looked 
upon as the most significant in 
this constantly progressing series 
of thresholds to date. For that oc- 
casion marks the end of your rela- 
tively care-free school days and 
the advent of the duties and re- 
sponsibilities which will certify 
your manhood. This is not to imply that between one instant and the 
next, you will suddenly grow up. But it does mean that from then on 
your attitude must change from that of one aspiring to grow up to that 
of one who can prove he is growing up. Essentially it is the difference 
between the school and the world: the first encourages you to grow, the 
second demands proof that you have grown. You are on your own. 

Being on your own there are many things you must be on your guard 
against, and I could spend pages of type warning you of these. However, 
I shall content myself with exposing two of these dangers and leave to 
parents and friends all the others. 

They are: (1.) "I'm as good as any other man", and (2.) "I'm entitled 
to my own opinion." 

Neither of these statements is true, altho each of them contains just 
enough of the truth to give rise to confusion and at times embarrassment. 

Consider #1. above. In the eyes of God and before the law you are 
as good as the next man — but beyond that you are only as good as you 
prove yourself to be. Obviously you aren't the equal of Joe Louis, or Joe 
DiMaggio, or Mario Lanza, or J. Edgar Hoover, or Chief Justice Vinson 
in their respective fields, or of hundreds of others whom you can easily 
think of. To put it plainly: in the eyes of the world you are only as good 
as the world is willing to grant; you must fight to establish yourself at 
your own evaluation. 

Consider #2. You are entitled only to express your opinion; no more 
than that. Having expressed it you may have demonstrated nothing ex- 
cept that you are hasty to speak and not too clear in thinking. For your 
opinion is valueless unless it is based upon an adequate number of rele- 
vant facts and is the product of deep and straight thinking. Far better 
to say I'm responsible for my opinion than to say I'm entitled to it. All 
too often the argumentative critter who maintains the latter finds in the 
end that he is "stuck" with his opinion. Hence it is no more than good 
sense to be sure of your facts, reserve judgment, and speak only when 
what you have to say will do some good. 

Carry the above items over the threshold into your future and you 
will find them useful there. 



The Threshold Of The Atom 

The class of 1952 is the eighth class to graduate into the atomic age. 
Just eight years ago next August, the bomb that shattered a Japanese 
city, as we all know, gave man a greater power to destroy man, and with 
it, a tremendous impact of choice — to kill or let live. However, we are 
one of the first classes actually graduating into a world using atomic pow- 
er toward peace. In fact, within this year, the first atomic furnace was 
constructed in Harwell, England — a furnace which will not need refueling 
until late in the Twentieth Century. Here is a definite stepping stone on 
the path toward constructive use of this potent atomic energy — . Prompt- 
ed by the installation of this "miracle" at Harwell, plans are being com- 
pleted to run ships and even planes by atomic power, and to further facili- 
tate production throughout the world by this energy. It is because we 
feel that this atomic energy will play a vital part in our futures that we 
use it for the PILGRIM theme. 

A threshold is an entrance. An entrance is no more than the site be- 
tween the place you came from and the place you want to go. It is the 
opportunity involved that makes the threshold an inspirational spot. As 
a person standing at the doorway to a church might well approach the 
altar to pray, as a worker entering a factory might well approach his 
machine to work, and as the student entering the schoolroom might well 
approach his desk to think, so should the youth standing at the doorway 
to an atomic age pray and work and think — all toward a purpose. 

What is our purpose? For most of us, fame and wealth are not so 
important as security and happiness. Among the 150 of us there will be 
scientists and technicians who will endeavor in new paths of the atomic 
field. There will be teachers and ministers who will develop logic and 
human understanding. There will be skilled workers who will facilitate 
their work by atomic power, and there will be workers of all types who 
will benefit from the storehouse of atomic knowledge. In this modern 
age, it is not now a problem to seek an interesting occupation but a prob- 
lem to choose from the vast opportunities offered. Opportunity has never 
yet been bounded by fences or ocean or atmosphere. 

The atomic age, however, holds more than a scientific meaning. It in- 
cludes consideration of human relations. "For God — for Friend — for Coun- 
try" is a challenge that requires us to give of our very best to three 
agencies and that one that discourages us from crowding out one in favor 
of the others. For one living in such a complex age, thought must there- 
fore become three-dimensioned. 

Difficult to become a worth-while citizen in a highly scientific age? 
Yes, but easier now to steer on the highway than to creep out of a blind 
alley later. You, Miss P.H.S. and You, Mr. P.H.S, and all your friends, 
with the aid of Mr. A. Tom hold the raw materials to make the world 
more interesting and useful and inspirational. Only one ingredient is 
missing and that is YOU. 

MARILYN GRIFFITH, 
Editor-in-Chief 



IN APPRECIATION 

On behalf of the PILGRIM Staff, the Editor-in-chief would like to 
thank Mr. Roland Holmes, the PILGRIM advisor, for his faithful guid- 
ance, Mrs. Margaret Brown, the art advisor, for her co-operation and time, 
Richard Blaisdell and his art staff who have worked overtime in the PIL- 
GRIM art work, and Sylvia Melahoures, who has always been prepared 
and willing to take any number of candids. 



PILGRIM STAFF 

1951 - 1952 

Editor-in-chief — Marilyn Griffith 
Junior Literary Editor — Joyce Contente 
Sophomore Literary Editor — Karen Engstrom 

Business Manager — Ann Hilton 

Staff — Nancy St. George, Asst. Manager; Adele Vandini, Sally 
Holmes, Constance Jennings, Joan Cavicchi, Claudette DiStaula, 
Barbara Cheney 

Art Editor— Richard Blaisdell 

Staff — Priscilla Tillson, Sally Eldredge, Joyce Brenner, Natalie 
Dennett 

Photography Editor — Sylvia Melahoures 

Staff — Benjamin Cohen, Dorothy Chase, Richard Carlin 

School News Editor — Patricia Parkhurst 
Asst. — Arlene Motta 

Senior Features — Marion Cadman 

Staff — Patricia Goodwin, Nancy Pellegrini, Lila Melisse, Sheldon 
Kaplow, Marion Muthig, Elaine Cavicchi, Jean Douglas, Roberta 
Anderson 

Senior Statistics — Laurien Enos 

Staff — Joyce Gallerani, Steven Tavares, Patricia Darsch, Barbara 
Brenner, Elaine Correa, Sally Mandell, Rollene Zaniboni, Theodore 
Jesse 

Boys' Sports Editor — Brooks Johnson 

Girls' Sports Editors — Nancy Prindle, Marguerite Holmes 
Asst. — Elizabeth Priestley 

French Editor — Janice Williams 

Latin Editor — Laura Hutchinson 

Science .- Math Editors — Ernest Souza, Arthur Atkins 

Typists — Barbara Mori, Natalie Santos, Rollene Santos, Constance Crowell, 
Shirley Cordeiro 



We Look 



Back 



USSS 




Se/i\o x s 




I am Miss P.H.S., a typical 
Senior. Like many other High 
School Seniors all over the 
world, I am worried about the 
world I live in. After going 
through a period of preparation, 
I am about to enter the thres- 
hold of the working world of 
my future. Will my future be a 
blaze of atomic warfare or a 
world of harnessed atomic pow- 
er put to work for mankind? I 
have other worries too — over 
my marks, my appearance, my 
clothes. I like the movies, my 
favorite being "A Place in the 
Sun". I enjoy reading when I 
can sandwich it in but I always 
read SEVENTEEN. Dancing and 
dating are my favorite pastimes 
though sometimes I just like to 
sit and listen to music like "Tell 
Me Why?" For dates and get- 
togethers, Leland's is my fav- 
orite; and pizza is my favorite 
snack. About people — I like, 
first of all, people with a sense 
of humor; but kindness and 
sincerity come pretty close. I do like school even though at times I pre- 
tend I don't. My favorite subject is English and favorite teacher is Mrs. 
Raymond. At times, I use a lot of slang, mostly "holy cow" and "gee whiz". 
The PILGRIM this year is my book and your's. It is a composite of my 
activities and yours. It is a summing up of a year and a steppingstone 
to the threshold of the Atomic Age. 




I am Mr. P.H.S., the typical 
senior boy. For three years now 
I've been planning for my fu- 
ture; the future in which I shall 
help to decide the fate of the 
world. I'm a pretty average 
guy. I like to spend some of my 
evenings at the movies; my fav- 
orite picture was "Frogmen". I 
also spend some of my spare 
time reading; my favorite mag- 
azine is "Life". But, I guess I 
devote most of my spare time 
to sports; most any afternoon 
you can find me at the gym, 
learning how to be a good ath- 
lete. I like to eat most anywhere 
there is pizza or any other kind 
of food. My music must be soft 
and dreamy; my favorite song 
is "Stardust". My favorite sub- 
ject, girls, has been a universal 
subject for a great many years. 
My favorite teacher is Mrs. 
Raymond; too bad she doesn't 
teach our favorite subject. I 
guess I'm going to be pretty 
glad when school is over; but 

deep down inside I know I'm going to miss it. The future seems a long 
way off now; but I shall try to meet it when it comes. 




2xa/Ld/ 



WORDS By 
Joan C avicchi 
2*l 




MUSIC BY 
PatParKhurst 




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vic-tory won, May hopes and vis-ions be 



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THRESHOLD TO PEACE 

Within the grey of dawning lujht 
A morning star of purpose shines — 
A star which leads the way to peace — 
The brotherhood of man. 
There's but one home upon this earth, 
For men are equal born. 
There's but one sky one universe, 
One God above us all. 
One faith sends man abroad to walk 
The yet unbroken paths ahead. 
One heart in one unbroken time 
Throbs out the tempo of our lives. 
The world which we inherit soon 
1 5 turbulent with cruelties 
And petty hatreds which can turn 
A man against his fellow man. 
God, grant us wisdom to uphold 
The rights of humankind, 
f Til understanding wakens love 
And freedom rules the earth; 
And we can proudly raise our heads 
And say to those behind, 
f, 0ur job is done. Our life was oiven 
To 6od~ to friend— to country. 

ialii^Man£iS 




Ofh 



icers 



BROOKS JOHNSON 



His personality and sportsmanship helped Brooks 
to the office of class president. He has served two 
years on the Student Activities Society and served 
as its president until he was elected Senior Class 
President. Brooks is Sports Editor of the PILGRIM 
and is an important cog of the basketball, football 
and track team. He has served on many dance 
committees and is a collector for the Cerebral Palsy 
Fund. "Brooksie" with his smooth dancing and 
striking friendliness is a person we will not quickly 
forget. 



RAYMOND BUSSOLARI 

"Sonny's" popularity and basketball fame have 
made him a fine choice for vice-president. His six- 
foot three inches sweep down the floor making 
baskets with ease and dexterity; and at the same 
time, he has received good grades. Ray was a del- 
egate to the Boy's State in his Junior Year as well 
as representative to Good Government Day for two 
consecutive years. With his solemn brown eyes and 
wavy black hair, "Sonny" has hopes of being an 
athletic coach. 







JEAN DOUGLAS 

Combining a sparkling personality with a winning 
smile, Jean has been secretary of our class for the 
last two years. "Jeanie" has helped lead our teams 
to victory as a blue-eyed blonde member of the 
Cheerleaders and captain during her Senior year. 
A member of the Glee Club and Octette for three 
consecutive years, Jean has been active in school 
shows and is a member of the PILGRIM features 
staff. Jean has proved to be a true sport as a mem- 
ber of the basketball team. 



MARILYN GRIFFITH 

Our dark-haired, industrious treasurer has set an 
active pace for all of us in her friendly, sincere way. 
She has been chosen as "Best Girl Citizen" by the 
Senior Class and was given the 4-H State Award for 
Citizenship. Last year she was Secretary of the 
S.A.S. and won first place in the American Legion 
Oratorical Contest. She has earned the position of 
Editor-in-Chief of the PILGRIM. Last year Marilyn 
won first place in the New England Science Fair and 
this year received an Honorable Mention in the 
National Talent Search. She is a member of the 
Press Club, Glee Club, Orchestra, Honor Group, and 
Honor Society. 









WE TRIED TO PAINT WITH SKILL AND WIT 
THE PORTRAIT OF EACH LAD AND LASS, 
AND THOUGH YOU DOUBT, YOU MUST ADMIT 
THAT HERE'S A MOST ATOMIC CLASS. 



HARRIET ADAMS 

She doesn't like her nickname 
— studious? — beware of her driv- 
ing someone in the 685th — al- 
ways with Betty and Joan — her 
sense of humor — specks — spark- 
les — know any good jokes? (!) 

ROBERTA ANDERSON 

"Bobby" — so dramatic — her nov- 
els — "I think that's so nice" — 
shrieking plaids — wacky sense 
of humor — fun to be with — her 
grand entrances — "Here I go 
again!" 



ROBERT ANDREWS 

"Bobby" — seen with Pete Will- 
iams — very shy, but a demon on 
the Carver Plains — sharp dress- 
er — loves cranberry products? 
— arguing "Hot Rods" with 
Owen — the silent man in auto 
mechanics — Mrs. Kingman's star 
pupil. 



ARTHUR ATKINS 

"Big Art" — lady killer? — always 
munching candy before school 
— favorite hair color is yellow! 
— very shy — a television bug — 
"Gimme a book anytime" — those 
Red Sox — likes sports — hates 
gym. 



NANCY BAILEY 

"Zeke" — Nance — '49 power glide 
Chevie — that Carver blonde — 
likes to ice-skate and swim — 
hates to be teased about cran- 
berries — favorite subject: Amer- 
ican History? — well-dressed — 
every girl loves her sister — oh, 
those Red Flops. 



MICHAEL BARRETT 

"Mike" — basketball whiz — good 
on figures (all kinds) — always 
fighting with Sid — up-and-com- 
ing boy — freckles are the spots 
of life. 



RICHARD BARUFALDI 

"Inky" — terror at the tuba — that 
laugh! — searching eyes — Ziggy 
and Sonny — Yankee fan — May- 
flower Sea Foods — band and 
football. 



ELAINE BATTLES 

"Lainy" — seen most with Pete 
and Barb — her face reflects her 
personality — works Pilgrim 

Drug — a high forehead signifies 
intelligence — quiet — her shiny 
hair — "Porky" — her little gig- 
gle. 



LAWRENCE BENASSI 

"Bud" — 33 Chevie — curly hair — 
likes to take his car apart — 
destination: Wentworth Insti- 
tute — President of the Honor 
Society — one of Carlo's harriers 
— always with Owen — bunny 
hunter. 



JOAN BESSETTE 

"Buzza" — likes dancing and the 
piano — she and Dianne — ambi- 
tion: travel to California and 
live in a mansion for two weeks 
— Mrs. R.'s private secretary — 
tall, blond men — hates Tran- 
scription but likes Business Ec. 
— a basketball fan — she'd love to 
have a shape like Jan's. 




S**6^ 




ft +— 





RICHARD BLAISDELL 

"Dick" — his "brilliant scintillat- 
ing personality" — wrestling on 
TV — Oh. can he draw! — sailing 
— blondes, blondes, and blondes 
— P. H. S.'s Milton Berle — car- 
toons and comebacks — Pilgrim 
Art Editor. 



ROBERT BORSARI 

"Bobby"— Krupa II— gift of gab 
— Walk-Over's — Brooksie, and 
Wing Ding — "Feel that breeze" 
— the senior floor terror — his 
hearty haw-haw — always avert- 
ing teacher's attention — super 
sole salesman. 



BARBARA BRENNER 

"Barb" — gooey banana splits — 
number please? — her wistful 
smile — Honor Society — Cheer- 
leader — future resident of 
Bridgewater State — hikes. 




JANE BRENNER 

"Janie" — '50 Red Nash — Daddy's 
little painter — always with 
Bernie — curly hair — Roxbury 
bound — always chawin' gum — 
destination: wedding bells — Pet 
peeve: woman teachers. 



RAYMOND BUSSOLARI 

"Sonny" — all-scholastic hoop 
star at the Garden — Zig and 
Inky — Legion baseball — seen 
most on the Carver road in his 
red Kaiser — crazy over home- 
work — Mr. Rogers' right hand 
man. 



JOHN CADMAN 

"Johnny" — racing cars — hangs 
around the garage — "Is that 
right?" — motorcycle maniac — 
ambition: to build his dream 
hot rod — mechanical cook? — 
ain't no prof, in English — pet 
peeve: people who dislike stock 
car - racing — seen most with 
Junior, Chuck, and Buzz. 



MARION CADMAN 

Remember her in Tuxedo Junc- 
tion? — always with Hilt — rides 
around in a green Pontiac — 
very fond of her brother — her 
hazel eyes — quiet 



JOAN CAPELLA 

"Jo-Jo" — service bound — likes 
typing and ice - skating (but 
where's the ice?) — seen most 
with Maryann D. — "Oh well" — 
a certain sailor — itchy feet. 






EARL BURGESS 

"Midge" — loves baseball, hockey 
— favorite class: study — he loves 
his Toni; it's so easy to manage 
— my frien' Ben — ambition: 
steam-fitter — tin knocker. 



SABRA CARPENTER 

"Boodge" — swimming, tennis, 
hockey — "See my driver's li- 
cense!" — Mama Urann's compo- 
sitions — Oh, Henry! — plays lico- 
rice stick in school band — a 
Currier's special — "God Bless 
America." 





LORETTA CARAMELLO 

"Lora" — Cherry Street Gang — 
very artistic — fast talker — she 
likes them tall and rugged — 
Buggy! — B. E.'s "My Destiny". 



JOAN CAVICCHI 

She tickles the ivories with a- 
bility — her hats — Take that 
thing away - I'm allergic to it — 
She and Pel — "Cavic" - wrote 
words to class song — destination 
- Boston University — quiet but 
interesting — Carnegie Hall. 







LORRAINE CASEY 

"Laurie" — giggles — O Kings- 
ton — talk-talk-talk — she and 
Betty Souza — how's hospital 
work? — loves cars — a great au- 
thor in 6th period study. 



WAYNE CATON 

"Wing-Ding" — football player 
and avid sports fan — a potential 
four letter man — always argu- 
ing with "Mole" — collects for 
Miss Downey — dislikes practice 
of any kind — Oh, that crew cut 
— American Legion's star trom- 
bone player. 



JOAN CAVACCO 

"Peachie" — green Mercury — 
"When Johnny Comes Marching 
Home" — Miss Talkative of '52 — 
oh! those eyes — Mr. Pyle's Pet 
Peeve — a little question box — 
she belongs in the stock car 
races. 



ELAINE CAVICCHI 

"Hop" — all-around athlete — 
minestrone maniac — avid movie 
fan — "Kid Dungarees" — brown- 
eyed blonde — voted "Most Ath- 
letic." 



DOROTHY CHASE 

"Dotty" — top honors at Science 
Fairs — seen most in P.H.S.'s Bi- 
ology Lab. — destination: Bates 
College — her hair is everyone's 
envy — she keeps Woodbury and 
Co. in business — "Dad, may I 
take the car tonite?" 



HARRY CHURCHILL 

"Church" — Mr. Cavity — lob- 
sterman — Tydol man — Navy 
bound — likes hunting two-leg- 
ged dear in Carver — likes sports 
— likes to pitch curves — star 
kicker. 



SYLVIA CHURCHILL 

"Silly" — likes sports, men, curly 
hair, and any form of relaxation 
— dislikes cold home rooms, and 
"The Sticks" — seen most with 
those "Manomet Hicks" — ambi- 
tion: to sit on the radiator out- 
side Room 301. 



GEORGE CLARKE 

"Herb" — all-round sports — he 
and Motta are bosom buddies — 
Swing and Sway with Sammy 
Kaye — Does he eat Wheaties? — 
"whiffle." 









SHIRLEY CORDEIRO 

"Shirl" — naturally curly hair — 
neat as a pin — Smith's little 
helper — when you gonna buy 
your hot-rod? — sure you can 
drive? — Sundaes at Leland's — 
"Spars, here I come". 



ELAINE CORREA 

"Ellie" — that lucky gal with the 
curly hair — "Charlie My Boy" — 
"Beautiful, Beautiful Brown 
Eyes" — "Oh heavens!" — a freck- 
led, blue-eyed blonde — Stude- 
baker — "I wish I could grow!" 




WALTER CORRIEA 

"Walt" — Steve's partner in foot- 
ball — future mayor of Carver — 
green Ford — misses Gonsalves — 
Mrs. Urann's bodyguard — Baby 
Lou — belongs to Carver All-Star 
Baseball Team. 




CONSTANCE CROWELL 

"Connie" — cool, calm, and col- 
lected — likes to sing — small and 
pert — green-eyed blonde — just 
about seen behind the office 
desk — pals with Ann and Joanie 
— that Personal Finance girl. 



MICHAEL CUOZZO 

"Mike" — Guidetti's right hand 
man — Boy's Club basketball star 
— witty — good man with figures 
— snazzy clothes — "Hot cha!". 




PATRICIA DARSCH 

"Pete" — another numbers gal — 
loves cooking and eating same — 
likes roller and ice skating — al- 
ways with Babs and Ann — her 
heart is aboard ship. 



NATALIE DENNETT 

"Nat"— artistic —"Oh Great!" — 
likes designing clothes — summer 
at Chatham — sailing and swim- 
ming enthusiast — peanut butter 
— still water runs deep — likes 
horses — life guards. 



MARYANN DICKSON 

"Dicky" — likes to roller skate 
with Joan and Sylvia — school 
sports lover — hates vegetables — 
future secretary — domestic type 
— favorite pastime: eating. 



CLAUDETTE DISTAULA 

"Claudy" — loves those Manomet 
parties — drives a hot-rod — likes 
all sports — seen most with Janet 
Stefani — great gum chewer — big 
brown eyes — make-up cards, 
her favorite game. 



JEAN DOUGLAS 

"Jeannie" — petite blonde — crew 
cuts — swimming — sings like a 
bird — a smile for everyone — 
class secretary — Capt. of Cheer- 
leaders — nursing in her blood — 
her long lashes hide her blue 
eyes. 









ANNE DREW 

Very friendly — neat as a pin — 
office assistant — cute smile — 
blushes easily — always cheerful 
— dependable — oh, so shy! 



BARBARA DRIES 

"Babs" — "Watch it" — Joan and 
Connie — a driving devotee — 
seen most watching television — 
destination: telephone operator 
— "There's always room at our 
house." 




JOANNE DRIES 

"Joan" — Friendliness — neat 
willing worker — good natured — 
excellent dancer — thoughtful of 
others — very quiet — lovely long 
locks — always seen with Anne 
and Connie. 



EDWARD DUGAN 

"Eddie" — the Marines have 
landed! — Mitch — "Got to" — 
cheeseburgers — Yankess — 
likes basketball — hazel eyes — 
1:20 enthusiast — card shark — a 
Homesteader — "I'm bashful". 




NANCY DUNLAP 

"Nance" — Florence Nightingale 
— Clara Barton, her alter ego — 
definitely a book-bug — that 
family tree — a singer? — "Oh, 
Latin IV is killing me!" — baby 
sister. 



DIANNE DYER 

"Di" — that certain guy — likes to 
play pin-ball machines — eats 
only because she has to — dances 
like a dream — big blue eyes — 
GI clip — loads of clothes and 
shoes — Union College. 




LAURIEN ENOS 

"Laurie" — Cooper's little soda 
jerk — green eyes — sports addict 
— Student Council President — 
the way she bangs those keys — 
secretary for some rich man — 
"'I hate men — but oh, you sol- 
diers!" 



JAMES FITZPATRICK 

"Fitzie" — a Plympton boy at 
heart — hates gym, but likes to 
watch sports — an art student — 
oh, that curly hair! — does he 
have a temper! — good things 
come in small packages — terror 
on the Plympton bus. 




MARIE FONTAINE 

A speed demon — seen most at 
Buzzards Bay and Old Colony 
Theater — spare or strike? — 
bumpers tight — Seaside Gang — 
Air Force? — those parties! 



JOYCE GALLERANI 

"Red" — likes the cinema — hates 
GYM — she's a good driver? — 
Miss Friendliness — good things 
come in small packages — that 
cackle — five feet, 99 pounds — 
Amen! 






BARBARA GARSIDE 

"Garsie" — a weakness for flyers 
— Buzzards Bay! — likes roller- 
skating — destination: business 
school — Billy — "I'm gypped 
again, and tripped again" — she 
and Marie — Otis Air Field. 



CHARLES GOVONI 

"Mickey" — left guard on foot- 
ball team — dynamite comes in 
small packages — Cavicchi's po- 
tato lugger — baseball's hard- 
luck kid — student at Joe Teves' 
Library — Daddy's car. 



RONALD GUIDETTI 

"Ron"— Kid Chesterfield— a lad- 
ies' man — finally caught the 
deer he always talks about — 
Mrs. Kingman's favorite student 
— always telling Kaiser about 
the one that got away — those 
horse races — DiSalvatore's right 
hand man. 



ANN HALL 

"Min" — purples and plaids — 
talks about Newport — sketches 
on the green — whiz on wheels — 
eyes for guys — avid sports fan 
— fun in art? 








PATRICIA GOODWIN 

"Pat" — seen most with Sylvia 
and Pat — favorite recreation: 
D. A. and sleeping — Woolworth's 
— that chuckle — vice: trying to 
get in the girls' room at 8:05 — 
hates vegetables — her sunny 
disposition — her chats with Ann 
and M.G. 



DONALD GOVONI 

"Don" — track demon — "Hey, cut 
it out" — ambition: to be a Gen- 
eral in the U.S.M.C. — pet peeve: 
working in physics and going to 
bed — seen most dodging state 
troopers — chums around with 
Barney, Horrible, and Jack — 
likes P-town because there's 
lots of nothing to do. 



MARILYN GRIFFITH 

She keeps track of our money — 
very friendly — busy little bee — 
voted most likely to succeed — 
comes from the cranberry coun- 
try — big boss of the Pilgrim — 
Science Fair honors — loves to 
write sad poems — Dr. Griffith. 



JOHN HATHAWAY 

"Barney" — sailing fanatic — that 
hateful 8:15 — bottle washer in 
the Cordage Lab — Miss Down- 
ey's pet pupil — argyles — track 
man — carrot top — a smooth 
dancer with "Hilt". 



CHARLES HENDERSON 

"Bruce" — hydraplane fanatic — 
aviator's license for a car — col- 
lects records — he'd give any- 
thing to play with the Harmon- 
icats — likes to "bum" down to 
the Cape — radio ham. 



ANN HILTON 

"Hilt" — likes red heads — 1936 
Dodge — "Gussy" — sailing — 
good dancer — debating with 
Holton — amateur disc jockey — 
Business Editor of Pilgrim — 
Colby. 





k 






CAROL HENRY 

"Shortie" — favorite pastime: 
writing — as seen by others: eat- 
ing — favorite excuse: not in the 
mood — ambition: to own a ranch 
in Texas — part of the Seaside 
Gang — owns two seats in the 
North Plymouth Theater. 



ANN HOLMAN 

She and Shirl are inseparable — 
Buzzards Bay bug — 302 chats at 
1:15 — the poems that never 
come — a certain boy too old at 
18 — too quiet. 



EDWIN HOLMES 

"Eddy" — seen most with George 
Ide and George Holmes — na- 
ture boy — loves television — very 
shy with girls — wants to be an 
accountant — High School errand 
boy. 



GEORGE HOLMES 

"Georgie" — he and Eddie — 
doesn't like gym or sports — 
favorite subject: auto mechanics 
— likes to argue with Carlo — 
candidate for high blood press- 
ure — opposes the new system — 
likes hunting and fishing. 



IRWIN HOLMES 

"Holmsie" — that lucky raffle 
ticket that won the car — an- 
other artist — a real blue-eyed 
blond — does he use Tintair? — 
likes outdoor life — quiet and 
shy? 



MARGUERITE HOLMES 

"Maggie" — Chiltonville Chicken 
— "Number pleaz?" — her spark- 
ling personality — Honor Society 
— "Air Force, here I come!" — 
Honor Group. 



ROBERT HOLTON 

"Horrible" — fleet-feet — sleep ex- 
pert — drives a '49 Plymouth — 
6'3" — likes to run, and not from 
girls — "brilliant sophomore" — 
Jack. 



LAURA HUTCHINSON 

"Andy" — Bell Bottom Trousers 
— an anchor around her heart — 
cheerleader — telephone operator 
— those 95's — she counts our 
lunch money — math shark. 



GEORGE IDE 

"Georgie" — wants to be a store- 
keeper — Manomet basketball 
and softball star — a brain in 
English — curly headed rascal — 
big brown eyes — Plymouth 
High's Henry Clay. 



MARY IZZO 

"Izzie" — Wednesday night mov- 
ies — Rockets fan — blue conver- 
tible — originator of invisible 
writing — neat dresser — squeaky 
voice — her ringlets. 




>!*%» 




ORMAN JENKINS 



MARY KRUEGER 







"Jenks" — has what someone 
wanted for Xmas — you'll find 
him at Town Square or the cue- 
ball palace — freckles — likes 
sewing — hangs around with 
Manny, Moose, and Monk — red 
neckties. 



THEODORE JESSE 

"Teddy" — Water on the brain — 
builds boats — lobsterman — 
hockey and baseball man — 
likes sharp sweaters — seen 
driving a pick-up truck — figure 
fanatic — hates neckties. 



BROOKS JOHNSON 

"Brooks" — class president — 
dynamic personality! — sense of 
humor — contagious laugh — 
ability to argue!! — neat — smooth 
dancer. 



RONALD KAISER 

"Horn" — hates girls — give him a 
hunting magazine anytime — 
wants a good hunting dog — 
favorite class: gym — pin cushion 
thumbs. 



SHELDON KAPLOW 

"Kap" — favorite pastimes: eat- 
ing, pool-shooting, more eating, 
tennis playing, and dancing — 
Miss Wilbur's favorite — "Eliza- 
beth" — hates being short (5'6Vi") 
— soda jerk. 



"Betty" — a vigorous cheerleader 
— floorwalker of the senior cor- 
ridor — arguing with Jean — a 
Wig-Wag— a Clyde Balboni fan 
— telephone operator — supports 
the Plymouth theaters — that 
correspondence course! 



BERNADETTE KUHN 

"Bernie" — Junior Vice-Presi- 
dent of Plymouth Federal Sav- 
ings and Loan Association — 
brown-eyed blonde — Janie and 
Joan— What's in Fall River?— 
always worried about bookkeep- 
ing (who isn't!) — Mr Romano's 
private secretary — pet peeve: 
third period study — wants a 
wardrobe like Janie Powell's. 



JOAN LaFOREST 

"Jean" — a budding artist — It's 
tremendous" — chums around 
with Cathy S. — seen most be- 
hind the fountain in Daddy's 
drug store — destination: Airline 
Hostess for Pan American 
Airlines — hates working on 
Saturday nights — combs her 
hair with an egg beater. 



RICHARD LD3RO 

"Brully" — likes to do nothing — 
a rod and gun man — always by 
his lonesome — guns for any- 
thing he can find — likes two- 
legged bunnies. 




BARBARA LODI 

"Barb" — a sports fan — dance de- 
mon — "I forgot" — Woolworth's 
novelty gal — a driving fiend — 
favorite subject: Bookkeeping? 
— movies and TV — hates men, 
but she'll have them medium 
height, dark, and handsome — 
ambition: Homemaker. 









SHIRLEY LODI 

"Shirl" — sporty — dual car- 
buerators — Cherry Street Gang 
— likes tall blondes with blue 
eyes — department store closet — 
galavanting — "Mama mea" — 
sweater gal — lucky to have a 
hair-dresser for an aunt. 





LORRAINE LOPES 

"Lorry" — always laughing — 
argumentative, especially with 
Shirley — favorite subject: driv- 
ing — likes her men tall, dark, 
and the last name beginning 
with C. — roller skating fan — 
famous saying: "Povra Amatica" 
— likes the boss. 



ALFRED LOPRESTI 

"Buzzy" — '37 Ford — likes to do 
nothing — grease monkey — a fu- 
ture sea-going bell-hop — earns 
his keep in the cage — the class 
of '52 leaves Buzzy 10c for razor 
blades — "Bet'cha boots!!". 




COLIN MacKENZIE 

"Mac" — anyone with a car — 
Buzzards Bay gals — Scotch and 
soda — roving kind — sea legs — 
"Good Lord!" — Manomet: God's 
country — hates Pilgrims — man 
on wheels. 



JOSEPH MAGUIRE 

"Bub" — "Toots" — loves his sister, 
but, oh, that car — all he wants 
for Christmas — sees best in the 
dark — that Irish smile — Kings- 
ton — a girl in every port. 



PHILIP MAINI 

"Big Dick" — likes to do nothing 
fast — loves button-hook passes — 
a good friend of Hostetter's — 
loves masonry work? — likes to 
dance! — a Ziggy Mondeau fan — 
he gets the most attention in 
6th period study. 



SARAH MANDELL 

"Sally" — a passion for South- 
erners — male dish washers — Ox- 
ford gray fiannels--Fords and old 
houses — pet peeve: fickle men — 
'Ye Gads" (in her Hahvahd ac- 
cent) — seen most with a make- 
up card. 



DONALD McGRATH 

"Don" — a lady killer (like Val- 
entino) — that baby smile — 
works the National money box 
to death — softball star — a neat 
dresser — likes sports — lives in 
corduroy jackets — favorite say- 
ing: 



SYLVIA MELAHOURES 

"Sylvi" — favorite hobby: Pho- 
tography — wants to work for 
the airlines — an art student — 
"Gee, golly!" — likes popular 
music — chums with the Carver 
and Manomet gals — tall sailors. 



LILA MELISSE 

Likes to dance — favorite class: 
English — always with Barb — 
works in Pilgrim Drug — likes 
cowboy music — "Oh, my hair's 
straight again!" — destination: 
marriage. 











HELEN MICHAEL 

"Lana" — likes to roller skate 
and dance — favorite sports: bas- 
ketball and softball— "Capeesh?" 
California bound — likes Book- 
keeping 1 — pet peeves: baby-sit- 
ting and getting up early — Phyl 
and Mary — favorite spot — Buz- 
zards Bay Rink. 



NORMAN MITCHELL 

"Mitch" — another Willie Hoppe 
— P.H.S.'s high jumper — Miss 
Kingman's pet peeve — always 
with Toots — let a smile be your 
umbrella — woman hater? — 
slick hair — bell bottom trousers. 



JOSEPH MONDEAU 

"Ziggy" — the man with a horn 
— a football star — oh, that crew 
cut! — drives a delivery truck — 
always in North Plymouth — 
seen most arguing with Chur- 
chill. 



LEROY MORGAN 

"Speed" — fast walker — likes 
fishing — Huckleberry Finn 
freckles are a sign of beauty — 
shy — hunting — Daniel Boone 
— flashy dresser. 



BARBARA MORI 

"Barb" — her parties — Pilgrim 
typist — bright plaids — her loves 
are clothes and music — she and 
Roberta — not a peep — mad driv- 
er — that certain Marine. 



ROBERT MORINI 

"Bob" — a J. B. fan — another 
Dave Ferris — Plymouth's all- 
star center — likes swimming — 
speed demon of the gridiron — 
"Please throw a spread-pass" — 
blue Chevie truck — likes art 
because someone else does. 



ARLENE MOTTA 

Giggling in study — never lacks 
breath — just mention Eddie — 
always singing (?) — hopes to be 
a teacher (poor kids!) — "I'll 
clue you" — that French accent! 
— those college boards. 



HAROLD MOTTA 

"Hal" — frequently visits Whit- 
man — Plymouth convertible 
coupe — good pass receiver — likes 
the wilds of South Carver for 
hunting — vacation (with pay) 
from school — housebroken — 
likes drum-majorettes — wait- 
ing for spring baseball. 



PATRICIA MXJRPHY 

"Snap" — operetta chorus — 
Shutterbug — Dramatic Club — 
those beautiful green Chevies — 
Where's Charlie? — always look- 
ing for the mailman — cocker 
spaniel. 



MARION MUTHIG 

"Marty" — strawberry blonde 

— pet peeve: Pel's inability to 
be on time — knits argyles for 
brother Bob — part-time student 

— those horrible Latin transla- 
tions^ — sparkling smile. 








WALTER NELSON 

"Nellie" — the husky- hustler — 
going to be a state trooper; like 
father, like son — sweet Swede — 
spaghetti lover — greatest rac- 
queteer in Pilgrim town — likes 
girls with long blonde hair and 
blue eyes — blushes. 



BARBARA NICKERSON 

"Nicky" — pet peeve: home les- 
sons — destination: air force — 
"I'm tired" — her friendly nature 
— baby blue eyes — quiet gal — 
a helping hand. 



BARBARA FECK 

"Barbie" — likes to argue with 
Lila — she's a gum fiend — "Dig 
a hole!" — Sully's other half — 
she's lovely; she's engaged — 
what does she use? — pretty 
blonde. 



NANCY PELLEGRINI 

"Pell" — a new outfit every day 
— Babyface — Oh, so shy! — put 
down that book — McClellan's 
maid — always combing her locks 
— whiz in Latin IV — Bridge- 
water. 









DANIEL OTCEEFE 

"Danny" — likes red heads — 
wants to join the army — works 
in the National — "don't call me 
Curly" — whiz in Auto Mechan- 
ics — quiet and shy? — former 
member of Rat Hole gang — Ir- 
ish twinkle in his eye. 




ANNE PALAVANCHI 

"Honey" — likes to ride horses, 
and dance — always with Joanne 
at football and basketball games 
— little ice - skater with many 
favorite sayings — destination: 
Air Force — pet peeve: one-arm 
drivers — favorite occupation: 
babysitting. 



ROLLENE PERRY 

"Pat" — likes Softball and danc- 
ing — Old Colony Laundry — tele- 
vision fan — home maker — likes 
to sing — part of the Cherry 
Street Gang — hates males and 
movies — Are you kidding? 



PATRICIA PRATT 

"Pat" — friendliness — pet 
peeve: make-up cards — favorite 
saying: "I don't know." — yearns 
for a '52 Pontiac — ambition: 
physiotherapist — Pat and Sylvia 
— happy days in art. 




■ 




Jm 




PATRICIA PARKHURST 

"Pat" — P.H.S.'s answer to Rub- 
enstein — she keeps the Senior 
Class Diary — favorite class: 6th 
period English — "I don't care!" 
— that hair-do — next year: Mass. 
State — casual and friendly. 



JANET PRETONI 

"Jan" — cheaper by the dozen — 
wise-cracking — Winnie and Buz- 
za — devoting herself to culinary 
art — live in Revere — Miss Hard- 
ware of 1952 — Holbrook. 




NANCY PRINDLE 



NANCY ST. GEORGE 



"Nanny" — all - around athlete 
— her plaid hat — "Gosh, I for- 
got!" — the Science Fair — product 
of Warren Avenue — late for 
French ? — shells. 



"Nan" — cashier at Currier's — 
seen most in the library — keen 
sense of humor — Hilt and Becky 
— Scotch plaids — those ads for 
the Pilgrim — <Press club — saves 
old track shoes. 




.£• 





EUGENE QUINLAN 

"Gene" — another Plymptonian 
nature boy — "we never thought 
he'd grow!" — seen most with 
Fitz, Dick, and ??? — Oh! that 
'37 Nash — great guy when it 
comes to friendship — clean-cut 
kid. 



DONALD REID 

"Shorty" — Paul Bunyan's neph- 
ew — super lobsterman — the 
house on the bluff — Celtics fan 
— all of 6'7" — super duck hunter 
— likes loafing - not bread — al- 
gebra demon — former pill-hill- 
killer — great moose hunter. 



KENNETH REID 

"Mole" — nothing but a Scotch- 
man — "mighty mite" — always 
arguing with "Rat" — borrowing 
Lenny Bernardo's neckties — 
great ticket seller for senior 
dance — will take any dare — 
Scotch and Italian national an- 
them. 



ROSE ROMANO 

"Rosie" — a movie fiend — likes 
basketball games — chamber- 
maid — bookkeeping menace — 
shorthand in longhand — all of 
4'9" — always talking about 
Glenda — "Gee whiz" — wipe that 
smile off! 



MARY SANTOS 

"Marie" — Pet Peeves: school 
and Bookkeeping II — Val's pal 
— '49 Nash — "Crying out loud" — 
those trips to Boston! — "jitter- 
bug" — sports addict — likes juicy 
books — those drooly "Mickey 
Finns" — strawberry ice-cream. 




NATALIE SANTOS 

"Nat"— "Tell Me Why"— dance 
floor demon — always busy bus 
waiting — favorite recreations: 
arguing and sleeping — head arm 
twister of 305. 



ROBERT SANTOS 

"Chickey" — always with the 
"Mole" — permanent member of 
the Club '50 — "I don't know 
'nuttin" — give anything to be 
five feet — demon on a bicycle — 
doesn't like swimming, but likes 
what goes swimming?? — avid 
baseball player — pan greaser. 



ROLLENE SANTOS 

"Roily" — a Rockets' follower — 
the Pepsi girl: more bounce to 
the ounce — Monday morning 
dazes — P.H.S.'s Imogene Coca — 
always heard saying, "What cha 
say?" 





JOHN SCHIED 

"Jack" — "turn on the radio, 
Jack" — visits Kingston often — 
one of Carlo's harriers - a neat 
dresser — Navy bound — Caruso 
of the showers — Haskell's 
friend! 



PATRICIA SOLLIS 

"Pat" — a member of Mr. Pyle's 
1:20 Club— got S. T. initiated in- 
to the 1:20 Club — always talking 
about Kathy— favorite hang-out: 
Pilgrim Drug — likes all sports, 
especially football and ice-skat- 
ing _ Sally Korth's right-hand 
gal. 







■ 




CHARLES SILVA 

"Bones" — likes sports and read- 
ing — those tricky test questions 
— a Carver resident — Wally and 
Frankie — life's aim: to be a test 
pilot. 



FRANKLIN SILVA 

"Linny" — doesn't like sports — 
likes girls — "Inez" — priesthood — 
Big Walt and Babby Lou's body- 
guard — drives a '46 Plymouth 
like a demon — cooking's his 
meat — Carlo's private tutor in 
Auto Mechanics — the little voice 
that wasn't there — the guy who 
taught Arthur Murray. 



RICHARD SILVA 

"Silvester" — luckiest boy in the 
shorthand class; in fact, the 
only one — drives a '49 souped 
up Ford — whiz at dancing — pop- 
ular with the girls — going 
steady with Barbara — Plym- 
outh's star hoopball artist — a 
baker — going to be a man. 



DENNIS SMITH 

"Den" — truck driver — likes 
hunting, running, swimming — 
lives between a jail and hospital 
— suddenly ill during deer sea- 
son — "Honest, I did the home- 
lesson, Miss Wilbur." 



BETTY SOUZA 

"Betty" — neat dresser — moder- 
ately shy — likes Household Arts 
— ambition is to have and drive 
her own car — always with 
Laurie — ticket lady in Ply- 
mouth's only theater. 



ERNEST SOUZA 

"Ernie" — beware of the quiet 
type — gets the morning news 
from Lenny — "Ho ho, that's 
rich!" — he's a "humper" of a 
dresser — that bashful smile — 
sport fanatic — Boston Braves — 
he's still waiting for the city 
series — best usher North Plym- 
outh ever had. 



JANET STEFANI 

'Jan" — loyal to Manomet — likes 
to swim — grease monkey's right 
hand — naturally curly hair — al- 
ways neatly dressed — hauls in 
the dough in the cafeteria. 



WINIFRED STENQUIST 

"Winnie" — chummy with Buzza 
and Jan — a whiz in English — 
belongs to the Buzzards Bay 
roller derby — likes football, es- 
pecially the way Bourne plays 
it— she's got the Swedish devil 
in her — "I'm gonna be a cush- 
maker." — that sweet little voice. 









PH ^* 



* 



\ : 





CATHERINE SWANTON 

"Cathy" — likes dancing — favor- 
ite subject: English — likes all 
sports, especially swimming — 
likes neat, conservative clothes 
— wants to be a secretary — those 
sporty socks — "Oh! Lord, I don't 
know" — seen most with Janie B. 




OWEN TAVARES 

"Cookie" — likes H. A. — hot rod 
happy — out-door man — likes to 
dog paddle — Mr. Romano's star 
pupil — always seen arguing with 
Pete Williams — Benassi's best 
friend — television fiend — loves 
to bowl. 



STEVEN TAVARES 

"Stevie" — flashing smile — co- 
captain of the football team — 
fishing for "buckela" off the 
shores of Portugal— wants to go 
to Brown University and play 
football — looking for the right 
thread on a knitted suit — he 
could live on pizza and spa- 
ghetti. 



JANIS TIBBETTS 

"Jan" — blushes — has a temper to 
match her hair — only red-head 
in Senior Class — don't ever call 
her "Red" — big tease. 



JOAN TIBBETTS 

"Joan" — no love for stenography 
— second shortest girl in Senior 
Class — likes gossip — loves to 
talk — writes to Kip in study — 
runs home every day for a let- 
ter — likes rollerskating — works 
at Woolworth's — always with 
Harriet and Betty. 



PHILLIP TINTI 

"Phil" — destination: Burdett — 
he's working on his second mil- 
lion (the first was too hard to 
get) — P.H.S.'s Webster — slaves 
at Morse and Shermans — so bus- 
inesslike — Constitution capers. 



BETTY TRAVERS 

"Betty Anne" — disc jockey — 
adores blue eyes and boys' 
sweaters — strawberry cokes — 
Harriet and Joan — Oh! that 
brother — a weakness for bru- 
nettes — an Eddie Fisher fan — 
Summer Street gang. 



CARL TURINI 

"Carl" — always at Pill Hill — 
football enthusiast — seen with 
"Doc" Savi — a machine in Auto 
Mechanics — finally got his lic- 
ense — argumentative soul. 



LEONARD VAZ 

"Len" — likes all sports — another 
Tommy Dorsey — he's a party 
boy — "Turn back the hands of 
time" during football season — 
seen most at Joe Teves' with the 
gang — Oh! that Vaz to Vaz com- 
bination. 



CONSTANCE VERKADE 

"Connie" — Oh, that blond hair! 
— roller skates her way through 
life — Manomet sprout — Janie 
and Janet — Dutch artist — a Sun- 
day school teacher — choir bird. 










RICHARD VILLANO 

"Dick" — Mr. Romano's right 
hand man — head usher at Old 
Colony Theatre — ambition: C.P. 
A. — very friendly — hobby: col- 
lecting I. O. U.'s — drives a grey 
Buick. 



DONALD WEEKS 

"Don" — a sports fan; Celtics are 
tops — likes swimming — at- 
tracted to the opposite sex — a 
Mama Urann star pupil — a sharp 
dresser — lobster fisherman — 
a buddy of Churchill's 'til they 
argue. 



JANICE WILLIAMS 

"Jannie" — basketball (No. 25) — 
she's a Carver belle — a great 
talent for dancing — likes to 
swim — destination: Wheaton 
(she hopes) — likes red Kaisers 
and cranberries — Hilt and Zeke 
— pet peeve: argyles — "All 
righty". 



ROBERT WILLIAMS 

"Pete" — likes to work on cars — 
owns a hopped up Model A — 
great chef: "Salty" — likes to 
hunt deer in his spare time — 
Cranberry diet — that Lux com- 
plexion — no peroxide there — 
Carver lad. 




HOWARD WOOD 

"Monk" — Woody — hunting — 
loves defense and offense when 
it comes to B — great bookkeep- 
er — always driving a truck al- 
though he can't see over the 
wheel — "Little Lulu" — al- 
ways making sizeable comments. 



LUCILLE ZANELLO 

"Lucy" — loves roller-skating; al- 
ways down the Bay — loves ill' 
ol' Falmouth — always arguing 
with F. F.— Oh! that kid sister 
of mine! — Revenue collector in 
305. 






ROLLENE ZANIBONI 

"Sasha" — "I'm late, I'm late" — 
lab happy — balances books on 
fire hydrants — P.H.S.'s Woody 
Herman— basketball fan — "My 
Dodgers!" — Mr. Pack's pride 
and joy (?). 




ass Frt 




Plymouth, once a tourist town, 

Into a vital city grew; 

The reason for this rapid change 

Was the class of '52. 

As I arrived home from New York, I was met at the Plymouth Air- 
port by the Mayor of our fair city, BEN BENASSI, with his private sec- 
retary, MAGGIE HOLMES. We proceeded at once to the BOB BORSARI 
Country Club where we were to meet the rest of the class of 1952 for 
our 10th year reunion. 

MARION MUTHIG, hostess and also dancer at the club, greeted us 
at the door. WALTER NELSON, police chief, and DANNY O'KEEFE, 
Lieutenant, were standing at the entrance conversing with ARTHUR AT- 
KINS, criminal lawyer, and SABRA CARPENTER, secretary at the F.B.I. 
Police Chief Nelson mentioned something about checking to see that the 
RONNIE GUIDETTI Gambling Laws were being carried out. 

JOE MAGUIRE, the country's most eligible bachelor, informed me 
that several well-known figures in the sports world were at the swim- 
ming pool. LAURIE ENOS, head of a successful advertising agency, 
showed me the way. 

GEORGE CLARKE, manager of the Red Sox and HAROLD MOTTA, 
manager of the Braves, were in a heated discussion on the diving board. 
Waiting patiently to dive off were RAY BUSSOLARI, star of the Celtics, 
and STEVE TAVARES, football coach at Penn State. WALT CORREIA, 
recently elected to the Ail-American line-up, and BOB HOLTON, track 
star, were sound asleep. LENNY VAZ, coach of P.H.S.'s undefeated foot- 
ball team, was enlisting the aid of Notre Dame's coach, WAYNE CATON, 
in fixing his portable. ELAINE CAVICCHI and NANCY PRINDLE, phys- 
ical instructors at Wellesley, informed me that "MICKEY" GAVONI had 
won his tenth fight at the gardens. 

I walked back to the club with that entertaining personality, JOAN 
CAVICCHI, who said she had finally completed her own version of "God 
Bless America". We found, upon reaching the lobby of the club, that a 
large group had gathered around those who had recently visited France. 
SYLVIA MELAHOURES, winner of the National Photography Contest of 
America, was taking their pictures. ARLENE MOTTA, French teacher 
at the Sorbonne; NANCY PELLEGRINI, one of the Nation's Ten Best- 
Dressed Women; and NATALIE DENNETT, famous artist, were in the 
group. 

I entered the cocktail lounge with TED JESSE and EARLE BURGESS, 
who had just built America's most luxurious liner. BOB ANDREWS and 
BOB WILLIAMS, cranberry tycoons, were ordering fast ginger-ale fizzes 
from part-time bartender at the Stork Club, PHIL MAINI. DONNIE REID, 
author of that new book, "How to Stop Growing", informed me that DON- 
NIE McGRATH had produced a new perfume which he had titled "Un- 
decided". SHIRLEY LODI will be given the first bottle free of charge. 



JEAN DOUGLAS, head nurse at the MARILYN GRIFFITH Hospital, 
entered with her staff of nurses, composed of SYLVIA CHURCHILL, 
ELAINE CORREA, PAT GOODWIN, and NANCY DUNLAP. Marilyn, 
founder of the modern hospital, has been winning scientific awards since 
high school. 

PAT PARKHURST, manager of Shiretown Newsstore, made a grand 
entrance with ROLLENE ZANIBONI, editor of the Zaniboni Times. Pat 
asked me if I had heard about EDWARD DUGAN'S being named Good- 
will Ambassador to France. I had already heard about it from NORMAN 
MITCHELL, television's newest "Answer Man". "Mitch", of course, had 
always known all the answers. "MIKE" BARRETT, owner of the Barrett 
Cab Co., and DICKIE BARUFALDI, president of the American Fishing 
Industry, joined the table and I found that the lights were being dimmed 
by electrician, AL LOPRESTI, for the first act of the evening, which 
comprised NAT SANTOS, specialty dancer, and WINNIE STENQUIST, 
popular recording song stylist. 

Feeling restless during the act, I slipped away and wandered upstairs 
to the library where I found LAURA HUTCHINSON, BARBARA BREN- 
NER, BETTY TRAVERS, and CONNIE VERKADE, teachers at Plymouth 
High School, meeting with their engaging principal, DONNIE WEEKS. 
Not wanting to interrupt their intent conversation, I kept on until I 
reached the kitchen. JOAN CAPPELLA, LORETTA CARAMELLO, 
MARY IZZO, and BARBARA LODI, dietitians at COLIN MacKENZIE's 
Manomet Cafe, were preparing the evening's banquet. I sampled their 
masterpieces and wandered on. Back in the lobby, that man of few words, 
LEROY MORGAN, was reading the Zaniboni Times, which headlined the 
robbery of the EUGENE QUINLAN National Bank. The bank tellers 
BERNADETTE KUHN, JANE BRENNER, GEORGE HOLMES, IRWIN 
HOLMES, and MIKE CUOZZO, had all been involved. Detective BOB 
SANTOS was still trying to solve this break. 

JOYCE GALLERANI, hair stylist at the ORMAN JENKINS Poodle 
Shop, and BETTY KRUEGER, owner of Betty's Bakery, joined me back 
at the lounge, where comedienne ROLLENE SANTOS was in the spotlight. 
PAT MURPHY, drama student, came around to our table to sell us an 
autographed copy of SALLY MANDELL's new book on dogs. At the table 
next to us LUCILLE ZANELLO, beauty consultant, was giving advice to 
NANCY BAILEY and ANN PALAVANCHI, who were chosen to represent 
Plymouth in a coming beauty contest. 

As soon as Rollene had finished her act, we departed for the dining 
hall. DICK BLAISDELL, famous cartoonist, sat opposite me with JACK 
SCHEID and DONALD GOVONI, congressmen. BROOKS JOHNSON, 
Speaker of the House, addressed the class before we ate. MARIAN CAD- 
MAN, the country's leading psychiatrist, suddenly became intensely in- 
terested in me. Finally, I excused myself before dessert and left the din- 
ing room. 

A few late arrivals were entering the club, I noticed. RONNIE 
KAISER and DICKIE LIBRO, new owners of the General Motors, arrived 
in their Cadillac. GEORGE IDE, president of First National Stores, was 
with them. OWEN TAVARES, owner of that fabulous hotel at West Pond, 
arrived in a Barrett Cab with BRUCE HENDERSON, owner of a chain 
of drugstores. 

HARRIET ADAMS, JOAN CAVACCO, BARBARA GARSIDE, and 
LORRAINE LOPES joined me in the lobby, and they discussed the new 



kindergarten recently opened in Manomet by "PETE" DARSCH. DOTTY 
CHASE passed us and I was informed she had invented false teeth for her 
toothless rats. JOAN BESSETTE, head of the Telephone Company, rushed 
in with one of her supervisors, LORRAINE CASEY, to say that HARRY 
CHURCHILL, Hollywood agent, was in the lounge with his discovery who 
had become famous at M.G.M., ANN HILTON. Ann was being interviewed 
by reporter, SHELDON KAPLOW, and the fashion director of Vogue 
magazine, NANCY ST. GEORGE, was taking notes on the interview. 

SHIRLEY CORDEIRO, owner of the Airline Training School, joined 
our group with that famous woman pilot, DIANNE DYER. MARIE FON- 
TAINE, ANN HOLMAN, and BARBARA NICKERSON, all teachers in the 
school were with them. CATHERINE SW ANTON and JOAN LaFOREST, 
air line hostesses, were also, among the group. 

The guests were slowly filling the ballroom for the entertainment of 
the evening. Rancher JOHN CADMAN and cafe proprieter, BOB MOR- 
INI, were clearing the floor. PHILIP TINTI, Plymouth's answer to 
Lowell Thomas, was rehearsing his speech while his secretary, CONNIE 
CROWELL, prompted him, to the annoyance of CAROLE HENRY, world 
traveler, trying to re-memorize her speech. LILA MELISSE and PAT 
SOLLIS, who had scheduled the entertainment, were nervously checking 
the lists. In the center of all this JANICE WILLIAMS, that sensational 
dancer, was trying out her kicks. 

ELAINE BATTLES, JOANNE DRIES and ANNE DREW, models at the 
BARBARA PECK Charm School, entered breathlessly with JAMES FITZ- 
PATRICK and EDDIE HOLMES, insurance brokers. DICKIE VILLANO, 
owner of the city's ten movie houses, and HOWIE WOOD, landscaper for 
Hollywood movie sets, were ushered to reserved seats. ERNIE SOUZA 
and "BARNEY" HATHAWAY, dental surgeons, were passing out dental 
appointments to all. 

Five minutes before the show began BARBARA MORI, Secretary of 
State, rushed in with that man of distinction, KENNY REID. They had 
just flown in after having dinner at the White House. MARYANN DICK- 
SON, CLAUDETTE DISTAULA, and BARBARA DRIES, Washington 
secretaries, obviously had come in on the same plane. ANN HALL, fash- 
ion director of Charm magazine, with her secretaries PAT PRATT and 
JANET STEFANI, were the last to be seated by ushers, JANET PRETONI 
and JOAN TIBBETTS. 

Master of Ceremonies, BOB BORSARI, began his speech and then the 
SILVA trio, composed of FRANKLIN, CHARLES, and RICHARD, took 
over with the song interpretations of ROSE ROMANO. As the entertain- 
ment progressed, I noticed engineer, CARL TURINI and scientist, DEN- 
NIS SMITH, falling asleep. MARY SANTOS, HELEN MICHAEL, and 
ROLLENE PERRY, hair dressers at BETTY SOUZA'S beauty salon, left 
to finish their dessert, and JANIS TIBBETTS left to find Danny. 

I turned my attention immediately to the floor, as the spotlight fell 
on JOE MONDEAU, and the audience burst into applause. Joe raised his 
baton and "Stardust" poured forth. The couples got up to dance and the 
clock struck 12:00. Like Cinderella, I left the Club and hailed a taxi to the 
airport. Plymouth was wonderful but Broadway was waiting. 

by Roberta Anderson 
with inspiration from my gang 



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Senior* Say 
GoodBy 



We never believed way back when we were Sophomores that it 
would be so hard to leave school with its rules, boring study halls, and 
homelessons. Why, to be a senior was almost to be free. Somehow, 
though, for Seniors, school takes on a special meaning — especially when 
you can count the schooldays left on one hand. 

As we walk through the halls after school, the corridors don't seem 
quite so bare as they've seemed before, considering all the friends who've 
housed their books there. And through the doors, the schoolrooms seem 
a lot friendlier and more cheerful when you think of the teachers who've 
helped and encouraged you. 

A water fountain we never thought much about. There was always 
a good excuse to get a drink before class so we could chat a minute to 
stall off the serious work. And remember how proud we were when we 
mastered the serious work and finally began to understand the geometry 
theorem, the French subjunctive or stenography! The halls are empty 
now without the pushing and crowding and laughing, without the couples, 
the crowds with their own delicious secrets, the homeroom huddles of 
week-end activities. 

The auditorium. As Sophs we'd gaze up at the balcony, and the Sen- 
iors seemed so sophisticated and good-looking and poised; but somehow 
when we stretch ourselves over the auditorium shelf, we feel strangely 
young. The auditorium where we saw the assemblies — the films — the 
speakers — the pep meetings and the German band. Our first Senior class 
meeting there and the tension over graduation clothes and flowers — . 

The gym. The Senior Dance where everyone handed over his 500 (no 
tax) with a smile, and how we nearly burst our buttons when the fronts 
soared above all the other Senior Dances. The gym where we went out 
for basketball or cheerleading. 

The office where you could get anything from help to a makeup card, 
and the Dean's Office where we went for advice. Remember how we all 
trooped in there to hear the results of our B. U. Tests that discovered our 
talents and abilities. 

The lab. Will you ever forget the day we made hydrogen sulfide, and 
the pungent smell floated right up to the Senior rooms? It was unpleasant 





but also triumphant because it broadcast that we were real scientists. And 
the biology lab where we made plans for the Science Fair, where the doors 
always seemed wide open, where there was always a rabbit or guinea pig 
and the ever-prsent rats. 

The library. Those study periods, endless at times, and short others 
when you left a theme for the eleventh hour. Time then to think of little 
things — of the drag of college boards and the hope that dwelt in them; 
of the solemn, inspiring Honor Society Initiation; of the pizza you made 
in Home Arts; of the surge to the cafeteria at lunch time like water break- 
ing through a dam. 

The bulletin board where you first saw your name on the Honor Roll 
or knew that you'd made the Pilgrim Staff. And, somehow, today, you 
notice a poster for the first time though it's been there a month. 

The art room where you made up the cast for the school shows and 
fashioned the Christmas scenery and the time near graduation where you 
worked breathlessly for perfection. 

Inanimate things seem alive because of the people who have touched 
them, and you realize that a school is a lot more than corridors and 
teachers and books. You realize that the world is unbelievably large out- 
side as you prepare to enter it as a full-fledged member. Yes, there's still 
graduation with its pomp and Senior Music and The Class Poem, and 
Class Night with its gaiety, and jobs and college and new friends, but 
there's something gone — as you go out that door — something you know 
when you're a Senior. 





BEST GIRL CITIZEN 

This is the sixteenth year that the National 
Society of Daughters of the American Revolu- 
tion has asked high school seniors through- 
out the United States to choose one from their 
number upon whom they could bestow the 
honor of Best Girl Citizen. The Class of 1952 
has on the basis of outstanding character, 
service, patriotism, and service bestowed this 
honor upon Marilyn Griffith. 

Throughout her high school years Marilyn 
has distinguished herself in school activities. 
Serving most efficiently as class treasurer, she 
has maneuvered us through financial matter*. 
Her fine work as Editor-in-Chief of the Pilgrim 
has made our yearbook a wonderful success. 

She is a member of the orchestra, has won 
recognition for her wonderful work in biology, 
and is a member of the Honor Group and Na- 
tional Honor Society. 

The Class of 1952 is proud to present 
Marilyn Griffith as its Best Girl Citizen. 

Patricia Parkhurst 




SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS 

Seated: Vice-President, Raymond Bussolari; Secretary, Jean Douglas; President, Brooks 

Johnson; Treasurer, Marilyn Griffith. 
Standing: Advisor, Mrs. Miriam Raymond. 



Activities 



K/n> 







1. Back to school 

2. First Pep Meeting off with a bang 

3. Get- Acquainted Dance — Hi Everybody! 

4. Ziggy's Debut 



5. Hey, Good Lookin? 

6. Armistice Day — The Principal Speaks 

7. Bonjour, Jean Hamel 

8. We pay our respects to Columbus with Fr. McAskell 




9. TIME editor comes to P.H.S. 

10. Representative from Cerebral 
Palsy Foundation thanks P.H.S. 

11. Miss Stillman from Ocean Spray 
talks up advertising careers for 
girls. 

12. PILGRIM jambouree at Wey- 
mouth 

13. Jr.H.S. entertains us with Christ- 

mas assembly 





14. Mickey receives award at annual sports assembly 

15. We take a world cruise with Mary Barry and her Marimba 

16. Johnny takes a bow at P.H.S. band concert 

17. Philip Tinti wins P.H.S. 1952 Oratorical Contest 

18. Yearbook convention at Whitman 

19. Plymouth, England, versus Plymouth, Massachusetts 





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CEREBRAL PALSY FUND 



Each year the Student Activities Society, under the sponsorship of 
Miss Downey, has carried on a charitable project. In the past years, the 
school has contributed to such worthy organizations as Care, the Veterans' 
Rehabilitation Hospital, the Children's Medical Center, and the Jimmy 
Fund. 

This year, the student body 
elected the Cerebral Palsy Fund as 
the project they would like to sup- 
port. Contributions by the students 
have been voluntary, and the stu- 
dents appreciate the opportunity to 
help the unfortunate. Every day a 
class representative goes through his 
home room collecting all contribu- 
tions. As soon as a room has received 
its assigned quota, the news is broad- 
cast throughout the school. Forty 
cents a quota is donated by each 
student. 

In December, the students were 
visited by the President of the Cere- 
bral Palsy Fund. She showed a very 
poignant movie of the youthful vic- 
tims of Cerebral Palsy, who were 
not able to live normal lives, because 
the impulses from their brains were 
not able to make contact with the 
members of their bodies. The students 
were shown that through research, 
physical therapy, and careful train- 
ing these children can be so devel- 
oped they can live more useful and happy lives. The students were 
deeply touched and have exemplified their feelings by their enthusiasm in 
completing their quotas quickly. 

The Plymouth High School students have been highly commended 
for their achievements. Last year, we were praised in the Boston Herald 
for our charitable efforts. 





CEREBRAL PALSY FUND COLLECTORS 

First Row: Jane Gunther, Miss Ellen Downey. Colin MacKenzie, Barbara Brenner, 

Mary Krueger, Karen Engstrom, Jeanette Brenner, Nancy Maloni, Laurien Enos. 
Second Row: Patricia Murphy, Joyce Busi, Natalie Santos, Beverly Tassinari, Joan 

Lexner, Janice Kingman, Louis Kierstead, Sylvia Sheehan, Sally Mandell, Patricia 

Smiley, Roberta Randall. 
Third Row: Frederick Sherman, Robert Morini, Christopher Hussey, Wallace Crowell, 

Laurence Benassi, David Keay, Ira Carlin, John Vancini. 



Student Activities Society 



The Student Activities Society con- 
sists of all members of the student 
body and faculty. Its purpose is to 
organize and promote school activities 
which include Assembly Programs. 

In September, the S.A.S. sponsored 
a "Get-Together" Dance which was 
very successful. Also, during Septem- 
ber, the S.A.S. presented a program of 
piano duets given by Louise Govoni 
and Patricia Parkhurst. November, 
Colonel Furlong, former army officer in 
the Far East, spoke on "Where Do We 
Go From Korea?" "Music Around the 
World" was the subject of Mary Barry's 
performance on the marimba in Jan- 
uary. Then, in April Russell Currey gave an informative and amusing 
talk on "Mind Your Manners." 

Under the direction of Miss Ellen Downey, the members of the S.A.S. 
Board and Council through the wishes of the student body have instigated, 
as the big project of the year, the collection of approximately $1000. Only 
a "Penny a Day" is required of each pupil if he wishes to join in the 
worthy cause of the Cerebral Palsy Foundation. 





STUDENT ACTIVITIES SOCIETY 

First Row: Nancy Prindle, Barbara Brenner, Constance Hadaway, Laurien Enos, Miss 
Ellen Downey, Roberta Randall, Wayne Caton, Karen Engstrom. 

Second Row: Natalie Santos, Lois Kierstead, Joyce Busi, Marilyn Griffith, Nancy 
Maloni, Jeanette Brenner, Patricia Smiley, Sylvia Sheehan, Jane Gunther. 

Third Row: Mario Crociati, Robert Morini, Donald Weeks, Lawrence Benassi, Francis 
Vancini, David Keay, Beverly Tassinari. 






OFFICE ASSISTANTS 

First Row: Constance Crowell, Mrs. Marion Whiting, Natalie Santos, Rollene Santos. 
Second Row: Joyce Gallerani, Laurien Enos, Sally Eldredge, Shirley Cordeiro, Janet 
McCosh, Lucille Alsapiedi. 




PRESS CLUB 

First Row: Sylvia Melahoures, Nancy St. George, Nancy Pellegrini, Miss Margie Wil- 
bur, Joan Cavicchi, Marilyn Griffith. 

Second Row: Cynthia Smith, Marion Cadman, Dorothy Chase, Carolyn Dittmar, 
Jacqueline Pizzotti, Laura Hutchinson. 



PRESS CLUB 



The Press Club of Plymouth High School is a business organization 
in reality. For gathering interesting news of the school and compiling 
it into a news column, the Old Colony pays the Press Club a certain fee 
a line. All the proceeds go into the Press Club Treasury which will be 
emptied later for some worth-while cause. 

Each member of this club has specific "routes" to take to find news. 
One person may write up assemblies, one may tabulate the scores of the 
sports weekly, and one may ask each teacher if he or she has an interest- 
ing bit of information. All this material is given weekly to Joan Cavicchi 
who improves upon it. Then the copy is typed and sent to the press. Then, 
we're after next week's news! 





BANK TELLERS 

First Row: Carol Connelly, Joan Tibbetts, Joan Cavacco, Joan Lexner, Elizabeth 

Elizabeth Pimental, Nancy Bartlett. 
Second Row: Elizabeth Priestley, Elizabeth Wood, Ann Guidaboni, Nancy Schiel, 

Bernadette Kuhn, Joyce Gallerani. 
Third Row: Priscilla Tillson, Richard Arponen, Nancy Pellegrini, James Goodwin, 

Christopher Hussey. 




lO* A WEEK COLLECTORS 

First Row: Carolyn Vannah, Christine Brigida, Joyce Contente, Lucille Zanello, 

Joanne Dries, Bernadette Kuhn, Joan Fortini, Cleta La Rocque, Roberta Anderson, 

Joyce Busi, Patricia Parkhurst, Rose Romano. 
Second Row: Mr. Mario Romano, David Keay, Ira Carlin .Beatrice Costa, Lois Kier- 

stead, Shirley Roncarati, Joyce Pederzini, Marie Hasz, Adele Vandini, Roger 

Weaver, Wallace Ruas. 
Third Row: Walter Correa, Alfred Tedeschi, Louis Sgarzi, Norman Mitchell, Orman 

Jenkins, David Maffini, John Hanson, Edward Borgatti, John Schied, Neil Ingenito, 

Ronald Ferioli. 



LIBRARY STAFF 

Have you ever searched fervently for 
a special book for book report day only 
to find a Latin Mythology in its place? 
Well, you certainly haven't in the Ply- 
mouth High School Library where each 
book is in order! Under the direction of 
Mr. Pyle the Library Staff takes charge 
of all books entering and leaving the li- 
brary, makes sure all the books are in 
ship-shape order, and keeps the book 
shelves neat and clean. Next time you 
rush into the library for a book, remem- 
ber all the work that's done behind scenes, 
and treat that book with care! 





LIBRARY STAFF 

Sitting:: Mary Ellen Callahan, Karen Engstrom, Cecilia Jacobs, Cynthia Smith, Shirley 

Garuti, Joan Lexner, Patricia Murphy. 
Standing-: Adele Vandini, Lucille Zanello, Barbara Brenner, Joan Bessette, Janice 

Williams, Joanne Dries, Joanne Fillebrown, Carol Proctor, Jane Brenner, Shirley 

Lodi, Mr. Arthur Pyle. 




DRAMATIC CLUB 

First Row: Phyllis Northrup, Jacqueline Weston, Janice Davis, Patricia Murphy, Cyn- 
thia Smith, Joyce Contente, Bernadette Kuhn, Arlene Motta, Marion Muthig, Joan 
Cavicchi, Nancy Pellegrini, Sheila Clough, Joan Tibbetts, Roberta Anderson. 

Second Row: Benjamin Cohen, Mrs. Alice Urann, Philip Tinti, Adele Vandini, Ann 
Zanello, Rollene Zaniboni, Jacqueline Pizzotti, Nancy Dunlap, Marion McGuiness, 
Carolyn Dittmar, Sally Holmes, Elizabeth Priestley, Nancy Owens, Betty Travers, 
June Wood, Arthur Atkins, Robert Buckingham. 

Third Row: Paul Baratta, John Schied, Shirley Garuti, Alice McManus, Patricia Park- 
hurst, Joan Bessette, Janice Williams, Nancy St. George, Lucille Zanello, Sally Man- 
dell, Patricia Goodwin, Elizabeth Bobb, Eleanor, Travers, Lucille Alsapiedi, Colin 
MacKenzie, Robert Holton. 

Fourth Row: Richard Sturtevant, Richard Blaisdell, Ann Hilton, Jean Douglas, Elaine 
Cavicchi, Rollene Santos, Natalie Santos, Nancy Maloni, Joyce Busi, Joyce Gallerani, 
Diane Brenner, Joan LaForest, Catherine Swanton. 




PHOTOGRAPHY CLUB 

First Row: Dorothy Chase. Sylvia Melahoures, Benjamin Cohen, Joyce Barlow. 
Second Row: Virginia Colas, Robert Grace, Carolyn Dittmar, Mr. Claiborne Young, 
Robert Simmons, Richard Carlin. 




RADIO CLUB 

Mr. John Packard, Connie Jennings, Bruce Henderson, James Fitzpatrick, Michael Cu- 
ozzo, Elizabeth Priestley, Joyce Busi, John Schied, Douglas Wood, Robert Holton, Rob- 
ert Gunther, Lawrence Benassi, Irwin Holmes, Richard Moore, Theodore Jesse. 



Key to Baby Pictures "Baby Atoms and Eves" 



1. Helen Michael 

2. Marilyn Griffith 

3. Sylvia Melahoures 

4. Mary Izzo 

5. Lorraine Lopes 

6. Joan Cavicchi 

7. Jane Brenner 

8. Steven Tavares 

9. Bernadette Kuhn 

10. Marion Muthig 

11. Joanne Dries 

12. Loretta Caramello 

13. Marion & John Cadman 

14. Ann Hall 

15. Nancy Dunlap 

16. Patricia Darsch 

17. Elaine Cavicchi 

18. Howard Wood 



19. Barbara Peck 

20. Ann Hilton 

21. SaUy Mandell 

22. Joan LaForest 

23. Constance Crowell 

24. Patricia Goodwin 

25. Shirley Lodi 

26. Natalie Santos 

27. Claudette DiStaula 

28. Catherine Swanton 

29. Donald Govoni 

30. Joan Cappella 

31. Betty Travers 

32. Rollene Perry 

33. Theodore Jesse 

34. Richard Silva 

35. Carole Henry 

36. Constance Verkade 



37. Rollene Zaniboni 

38. Dorothy Chase 

39. Anne Drew 

40. Patricia Murphy 

41. Maryann Dickson 

42. Janet Stefani 

43. Janis and Joan Tibbetts 

44. Patricia Pratt 

45. Patricia Sollis 

46. Joan Bessette 

47. Elaine Correa 

48. Dianne Dyer 

49. Barbara Brenner 

50. Laura Hutchinson 

51. Rollene Santos 

52. Nancy Pellegrini 

53. Arlene Motta 

54. Joan Cavacco 




SCIENCE SEMINAR 

Left to right: Sally Holmes, Cecelia Jacobs, Joyce Contente, Dorothy Chase, Mr. Young, 
Marilyn Griffith, Adele Vandini, Janice Davis. 



SCIENCE SEMINAR 

Protozoa! Penicillin! People! All these widely-diversified topics are 
subjects for discussion in the newly-organized Biology Science Seminar 
which is maintained for those deeply-interested in biology, the science of 
living things, and are desirous of thinking and working creatively. Very 
informal in its organization, a typical seminar meeting consists of reports 
of current science literature and its effects on the world, summaries of 
famous scientists' lives, bits of general scientific knowledge gleaned from 
everywhere, a discussion on one prepared topic, and finally, the talks of 
guest speakers, both student and adult. There are no limitations to the 
topic for a meeting except that it must deal with living organisms and 

must involve creative thinking. 
Mr. Young, the organizer, has 
established the seminar in con- 
junction with the Science Clubs 
of America, not only to develop 
interest in current scientific e- 
vents but to encourage thinking 
in a scientific world. 





SUN SETTERS 






i 



% 




.* 



"Swing: your partner 'round the hall, 
Honor your corner and grand chain all." 

Every Tuesday night the gym is filled with laughter and music. 

. Mrs. Doyle's fingers fly over the piano keys, whizzing out peppy 

favorites of the past. The Sun Setters, a group of senior high school 

y students, meet once a week for the purpose of square dancing. And 

j who's that calling? Why, that's Mr. Young, wearing his bright red 

and white square dancing shirt. 

People have asked what the Sun Setters 
are and what they do. How did they start? 
What are their plans? The square dancing in 
Plymouth was in a terrible state. Mr. Young 
likes to see good dancing and people having 
fun, so he decided to do something about it. 
As soon as Mr. Mongan's consent was given, 
the Sun Setters were organized. 

Things really get started Tuesday night 
in the gym on the dot of five. This is about the time that the sun sets 
in the fall. We dance until six-thirty. This hour and a half is a pleas- 
ant period of instruction. 

On March 6, of this year, a benefit square dance was held to help 
a Kingston family. The calling was done by "The New Hampshire 
Woodsman", assisted by the "Woodchips". Yes, you guessed it! Mr. 
Young was "The New Hampshire Woodsman". The Sun Setters, alias 
"The Woodchips", were there to help the people with the steps and to 
enjoy the dancing. 

This, we hope, is only the beginning. As long as Mr. Young will 
call the dances, the Sun Setters hope to dance Plymouth High School 
right into some of New England's well known dance festivals. 



V. 



~fi 




SUN SETTERS 

Christopher Hussey, Patricia Baker, Robert Simmons, Joyce Contente, Roger Weaver, 
Richard Sturtevant, Ann Guidoboni, Nancy Morse, Richard Blaisdell, Jeanette Bren- 
ner, Sally Eldredge, Wallace Crowell, Nancy St. George, Claire Connelly, Mary 
Ellen Callahan, Betsy Anderson, Alfred Tedeschi, Ira Carlin, Nancy Maloni, John 
Scheid, Sally Mandell, John Packard, Janice Davis, Adele Vandini, Sally Holmes, 
Robert Holton, Marion Cadman, Karen Engstrom, Mr. Claiborne Young. 




PILGRIM STAFF 

Back Row: Steven Tavares, Richard Carlin, Philip Tinti, Karen Engstrom, Elaine Cav- 
icchi, Joyce Brenner, Elaine Correa, Constance Crowell, Betty Travers, Joyce Gal- 
lerani, Arthur Atkins, Ernest Souza. 

Third Row: Theodore Jesse, Constance Jennings, Sarah Mandell, Sarah Holmes, Shirley 
Cordeiro, Claire Baratta, Natalie Dennett, Laurien Enos, Rollene Santos, Patricia 
Goodwin, Barbara Mori, Marion Muthig, Rollene Zaniboni, Benjamin Cohen. 

Second Row: Mr. Roland Holmes, Arlene Motta, Patricia Darsch, Barbara Brenner, Dor- 
othy Chase, Joan Cavicchi, Nancy Pellegrini, Elizabeth • Priestley, Sally Eldridge, 
Priscilla Tillson, Roberta Anderson, Natalie Santos, Lila Melisse, Jean Douglas, 
Claudette DiStaula. 

Front Row: Nancy Prindle, Adele Vandini, Sylvia Melahoures, Laura Hutchinson, 
Nancy St. George, Joyce Contente, Marilyn Griffith, Ann Hilton, Richard Blaisdell, 
Marguerite Holmes, Patricia Parkhurst, Janice Williams, Marion Cadman. 





HONOR GROUP 

First Row: Mrs. Miriam Raymond, Laura Hutchinson, Marion Cadman, Betty Travers, 
Marion Muthig, Marguerite Holmes, Patricia Darsch, Constance Crowell, Joanne 
Dries, Sylvia Melahoures. 

Second Row: Dorothy Chase, Lawrence Benassi, Joyce Gallerani, Janet Stefani, Janice 
Williams, Barbara Brenner, Marilyn Griffith, Donald Weeks. 

Third Row: Ernest Souza, Elaine Correa, Laurien Enos, Nancy Prindle, Nancy Pelle- 
grini, Joan Cavicchi, Bernadette Kuhn. 

NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY 

In an impressive ceremony on March 24, six Juniors and four Seniors 
became new members of the National Honor Society. In order to become 
a member, one must possess outstanding qualities of scholarship, leader- 
ship, character, and service, and must be elected by the student body and 
faculty. 




HONOR SOCIETY 

First Row: Laurien Enos, Joanne Dries, Marguerite Holmes, Dorothy Chase, Lawrence 
Benassi, Barbara Brenner, Marilyn Griffith, Laura Hutchinson. 

Second Row: Patricia Baker. Joyce Contente, Benjamin Cohen, Nancy Pellegrini, 
Richard Carlin, Janice Williams, Adele Vandini, Miss Helen Johnson, Sally Holmes, 
Joan Cavicchi, Sylvia Melahoures. 



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BAND AND DRUM MAJORETTES 

First Row: Rollene Zaniboni, Patricia Smiley, Roberta Randall, Marcia Scagliarini, 

Roger Weaver, Mr. John Pacheco, Joan Carton, Joyce Contente, Sabra Carpenter. 
Second Row: Louis Sgarzi, Wallace Ruas, William Sgarzi, Mario Crociati, Richard 

Barufaldi, Alfred Lopresti, Francis Vancini, Paul Baratta, David Mello, Lewis 

Bartlett. 
Third Row: Joseph Ferriera, Donald Weaver, Neal Ingenito, Alfred Vierra, Orman 

Jenkins, Louis Cecco, James Dykeman, Leonard Vaz, Wayne Caton. 
Fourth Row: Robert Wager, Wallace Crowell, Robert Borsari, Joseph Mondeau, 

William Zucchelli, Ronald Montanari, Raymond Longhi, Richard Carlin, James 

Northrup. 




ORCHESTRA 

First Row: Marilyn Griffith, Ira Carlin, Rollene Zaniboni, Sabra Carpenter, Patricia 
Goodwin, Mr. John Pacheco, Alfred Vieira, Sylvia Melahoures. 

Second Row: Richard Barufaldi, Robert Borsari, Robert Wager, Mario Crociati, Ray- 
mond Longhi, Joseph Teves, David Mello. 

Third Row: Wayne Caton, Leonard Vaz, Joseph Mondeau, Louis Cecco, Wallace Ruas, 
George Lewis. 






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GLEE CLUB 

First Row: Sylvia Melahoures, Cynthia Smith, Elizabeth Anderson, Diantha Gould, 
Dorothy Chase, Alice McManux, Christine Brigida, Rollene Zaniboni, Cecilia Jacobs, 
Patricia Baker, Dolores Almeida, Patricia Parkhurst, Marilyn Griffith. 

Second Row: Catherine Swanton, Ann Zanello, Joyce Contente, Mary Ellen Callahan, 
Janice Davis, Adele Vandini, Shirley Garuti, Phyllis Northrup, Marion Cadman, 
Ann Hilton, Nancy St. George, Patricia Murphy, Lucille Zanello. 

Third Row: Marie Hasz, Sally Mandell, Judy Thorn, Sally Holmes, Sabra Carpenter, 
Nancy Maloni, Joan Fortini, Claire Connelly, Carol Connelly, Marilyn Clarke, Sally 
Eldredge, Sheila Clough, Janice Williams. 




OCTETTE 

First Row: Sheila Clough, Elizabeth Anderson, Joyce Contente, Janice Davis, Adele 
Vandini, Patricia Baker. 

Second Row: Sally Holmes, Patricia Parkhurst, Accompanist; Sylvia Melahoures, Ac- 
companist; Christine Brigida, Cecilia Jacobs. 




LE CERCLE JEAN D'ARC 

Nancy St. George, Nancy Prindle, Patricia Darsch, Janice Williams, Marilyn Griffith, 
Barbara Brenner, Lucille Zanello, Miss Jeanette Jacques, Elaine Battles, Joan Cavicchi. 



Le Cercle Jeanne D'Arc 

Organized at Russell Street on 
Tuesday, the second of October, our 
French Club consists of 9 struggling 
French students and "le professeur 
francais", Miss Jacques. That after- 
noon we planned for our future 
meetings. We decided to make this a 
strictly social club without the use of 
French. 

Our first meeting, the sixth of 
November, was held in Room 30. 
Here we congregated to pack a box 
for a little French girl. We filled it 
with a sweater, school equipment, ornaments 
delight the poor little girl for Christmas. 

Next on the agenda came Christmas. To 




and things with which to 



celebrate this, 



"tea" at which we served coffee or 



we went to 
tea. We ex- 



the Blue Blinds to have a 
changed joke gifts also. 

Being a group of food lovers, we decided that two girls should cook 
us a meal at Miss Jacques' apartment, February. Thus, the French Club 
enjoyed a luxurious meal with real Italian spaghetti for the main course. 

We are looking forward to a visit with Joan Cavicchi in March. Joan 
is going to present a selection of French tunes, which should be very ap- 
propriate and appealing. 

April will be our biggest affair of all. We are planning a Boston spree. 
With enormous appetites we plan to devour some luscious "cuisine fran- 
caise" at "Le Henri Quatre" restaurant. From there we will attend a 
matinee pertaining to France. 

"Le Finis"will be a cook-out in May. We certainly can say that we 
have spent many an interesting and enjoyable afternoon in our Club 
called "Le Cercle Jeanne D'Arc". Janice Williams 




JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS 

Seated: Vice-President, Richard Sturtevant; Secretary, Joyce Busi; President, Daniel 

Beaton; Treasurer, Mario Crociati. 
Standing:: Miss Nellie Locklin, Advisor. 




SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS 

Seated: Louis Sgarzi, Treasurer; Sylvia Sheehan, Secretary; Edward Borgatti, President; 

Francis Merritt, Vice-President. 
Standing: Miss Iris Albertini, Advisor. 



ALL Around 




Advice to the Seniors As Future Freshmen of the World 




cuLty 




1. Roland Holmes — 

Now is the "Time of your life'' — 
it is tomorrow's seed; sow it well. 

2. Elizabeth Kelly — 

Always do your share of work willingly — Have 
a sense of humor — Be considerate of the other 
fellow. 




3. John Pacheco — 

Music, Music, Music. 

4. Jeanette Jacques — 

Soyez grands! 

5. Iris Albertini — 

"To choose with careful eye 
The things to be remembered by." 

6. Edgar J. Mongan — 

In the Universe of the World, 
Performance counts, not words. 

7. Ardys Farnsworth — 

A good sport is naturally a good winner, 
but also a good loser. 

8. Harold Rogers — 

Listen more — 
Talk less!— 



8 








1. Miriam Raymond 

May you meet well the high chal- 
lenge of your class motto. 

2. Helen Johnson — 

"To thine own self be true, 
And it must follow as the night 

the day — 
Thou cans't not then be false to 

any man." 

3. Joffrey Nunez — 

You can't fool teachers. 

4. Alice Urann — 

Grin and bear it! 



5. Margie Wilbur — 

"Esse quam videri" 

6. Claiborne Young — 

Make a plan — then work your 
plan. 

7. Helen Bagnall — 

A positive attitude, consideration 
for the other fellow, and sense of 
humor will help. 

8. Richard Smiley — 

4 
(In bottom right corner) 

Be careful of the pitfalls as you 

drive down the road of life. 





1. Mario Romano 

Face the future with a desire to work, do well and more too; you are only 
beginning. 

2. John Packard — 

A word to the wise is sufficient — work well! 

3. Lydia Gardner 

To get along with others be cheerful, courteous, considerate and co-operative. 

4. Arthur G. Pyle 

If you ever go fishing be sure to catch a fish so big that even you won't have 
to lie when telling about it. 

5. Nellie Locklin — 

My advice to Seniors — Work. 

6. Virginia Kingman — 

Be sure to remember you get out of life exactly what you put into it. 

7. Carlo Guidaboni — 

"Enjoy yourselves, it's later than you think." 

8. Ellen Downey — 

"You can lead a horse to water, but you can't make him drink." 

9. Margaret Brown — 

Really do the job you have to do, enjoy that job, consider those you are working 
with, and, chances are, you'll be happy and succeed. 






FRENCH III. 

To the uninitiated, French III is just another class. However, those 
of us who belong to the exclusive set of nine mademoiselles, one monsieur, 
and le professeur know better. Just open the door to Room 30 and listen 
awhile. Somone is translating a difficult description, and the others wait, 
expecting to be called on at any moment. Soon you will see the whole 
class troop to the board to write French sentences which are too often in 
need of an enormous quantity of correcting chalk. If you are very fortu- 
nate, you will hear the class record on the wire recorder; and when the 
French is played back, the experience is both amusing and helpful. This 
isn't all. Stay a bit and you will hear members of the class carry on French 
conversations which include ordering a full-course dinner or talking with 
a cabbie. You will hear of French history, art, and music, of drama, poli- 
tics, and fashions, and of delectable French cuisine. Does that convince 
you? Now you realize why the French III Class feels "francais" from head 
to toe as it passes through the corridors, back to its native land. 






FH SSHfii 



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Science 




Household Arts 




£ iterator* 




Atomic Contest 



FOR BETTER OR WORSE? 

With the explosion at Hiroshima came the most complex problem of 
the world — past, present or future. "Should we use the far reaches of 
atomic energy for warfare or peacetime production?" 

If left in our hands, we would probably use it for useful peacetime 
construction. This power can be put to such a myriad of uses that the 
complete list would astound us. A few such used are as follows: cobalt 
and iodine, radioactivized, are a good source of cure for tumor patients. 
By using radioactive materials and Geiger counters, scientists can tell 
how a wound heals, what goes into the filling of an ear of corn, and 
whether grease really gets into a bearing. Also atomic energy gives off 
tremendous heat and light. 

As a direct opposite, if it is left to greedy fanatics, it can spell the end 
of humanity. It is a weapon of which none of us knows the potentialities. 
Hiroshima is a good example of an infinitesimal amount of energy com- 
pared with the total power it could release. Do we want the earth to be- 
come a small sun? 

What we make of atomic energy is for us to choose. This is not a mat- 
ter for scientists alone but for every citizen. 

Atomic energy is the creation of science. Every scientist searches at 
midnight to pray that this creation will become a blessing. The prayer is 
in all our hearts; its fulfillment lies in our hands. 

John Packard '54 

ON ATOMIC ENERGY 

Awful is the terror it yields, 
Tireless is its destructive force, 
Odious is the trident which it wields. 
Majestic as it runs its evil course; 
Intent upon the spread of deadly rays, 
Changing the dark night to the glare of day. 

Equal nearly to the wrath of God, 
Neutral to all men, impartial to all sod; 
Ending the work that man has done, 
Ruinous as the desert sun; 
God, for safe delivery, 
Yearningly, we pray to Thee. 

Diana Silva '54 



SOLDIERS 

Looking into the future, this is what I see: 
Ten thousand weary soldiers filing in front of 

me; 
They're young; they're old; they're meek; 

they're bold. 
I feel their warm breaths on my face — 
I hear their hearts beat at a distorted pace; 
I see the day turn into gray, 
As our soldiers march away. 
Amidst this mass of strained emotion, 
I see the pangs of pained devotion; 
Though they vanish into the mist. 
Our lives will still exist, — to love, to hate, to 

weep, to wait — 
While the gray turns into day, 
Our soldiers march away! 

Joyce Brenner '54 



AThou<ghtorTwo 

"AND THERE IS NO WAR" 
They climbed the hill together — 
The two young brave marines. 
Both were rugged sergeants, 
Though barely past their teens. 
They both had fought in battle 
In Korea from the start 
Yet, their ideas differed greatly 
And their worlds were far apart. 
Basically, they were the same — 
Neither held a grudge 
Why this war was being fought 
They felt no cause to judge. 
And, as they climbed together. 
It was suddenly very clear 
That their thoughts were far away that 

night 
On the ones whom they held dear. 
It wasn't in the words they spoke 
It was something deep inside — 
Something unexplainable — 
As if their hearts had cried 
With each step the boys had climbed 
They'd resigned themselves to fate — 
And now there was nothing else to do 
Except to wait, and wait. 
Side by side, they knelt to pray 
And raised their eyes to God 
They stood, and turned, and slowly met 
The enemy's firing squad. 

Roberta Anderson '52 

INFILTRATION or THE MARCH OF COMMUNISM 

Today, Comrade Termites, I am going to discuss with you the found- 
ing of Rome. You have all, no doubt, heard the popular American theory 
that it was founded by Romulus and Remus. Like all American theories, 
this is incorrect. Unfortunately it is being taught in this school along with 
many other examples of American propaganda. For this reason, comrades, 
we are working daily to reduce it to a futile heap of sawdust. 

But to return, fellow termites and communists, to the founding of 
Rome. Romulov, a faithful member of the party, left Russia, taking only 
a hammer and a sickle, and built Rome with the help of his brother Rem- 
uski. The early Romans, too stupid to learn the beautiful and intricate 
Russian language, were taught to speak Latin, a language based on Rus- 
sian, although by no means satisfactory, or as liquid. 

Then, comrades, tragedy struck. Remuski, the brother of Romulov, 
had once travelled to America. Being a trifle weak-minded, he was con- 
verted to Capitalism, the scourge of the people. 

Unknown to Romulov, Capitalism was spread by this traitor among 
the innocent Romans. Remuski at last, however, made a mistake which 
cost him his life. On his way to breakfast one morning, he passed the pic- 
ture of Stalin and neglected to salaam three times. Romulov saw him and 
instantly shot and killed him. But, alas, it was too late. Capitalism, like a 
dread disease, had pervaded the city and Romulov was forced to return 
to Russia, a sadder but a wiser man. 

The Romans continued to give trouble. Rather than mine iron, com- 
rades, they began chipping pieces off the Iron Curtain. Do not gasp, com- 
rades. Crime is always the product of Capitalism. As you might have sus- 
pected, it became necessary for the glorious Russian army to enter Rome 
and lead its citizens to the path of Communism. Directly matters improv- 
ed. As that great Russian orator, Circeroski, was wont to say, "Comrades, 
things are pickin' up." Such a sentiment might have been expressed by 
a Roman party member of the period. 

And that, comrades, began the rise of Rome. For tonight's assignment, 
we shall begin demolishing the roof, and tomorrow I will tell you about 
the great and famous Russian general, Caesaroff. 

Class is dismissed! Maristene Jess '53 




and Spice 



HIS BEST GIRL 
If I could only be that girl, 
Whom he thinks a priceless pearl; 
With level head and mind so strong, 
Unable to do any wrong; 
If I could only withstand grief, 
Hide my fears, restrain my tears; 
If I could learn to be as true 
To him as he is to me too; 
If I could learn to care for health 
And care not quite so much for wealth; 
If I'd confess when I'm to blame 
Be unconcerned with a life of fame; 
If I could live to love and learn, 
To be loved by him in turn; 
Then I could be his priceless pearl, 
Or in other words, his best girL 

Jean Douglas '52 



O WIND! 
Your stinging gusts strike 
My flesh with piercing blades, 
And tears fill my eyes, 
As all sense of beauty fades. 
Your frigid breath seeps 
Through my body with drilling force, 
Striving, with massive strength, 
To thrust me off my course. 
Your icy fingers caress 
The frozen countenance of my face, 
While you dance and scuttle briskly 
With an agile grace. 

Carolyn Vannah '54 



IN STUDY HALL 

With a crash, a bang and a zoom — 

A ruler flies across the room; 

'Tis a familiar scene in study hall, 

Where no one really studies at all. 

From the back of the room 

Comes a buzzing sound, 

Making the Prof, leap with a bound 

He quiets all the buzzing bees, 

And then, at last, he sits at ease. 

Jane Montanari 
English IIB 



BY THE DAWN'S EARLY LIGHT 
When I got up this brisk, cold morn 
I saw the frost upon the lawn; 
The hills extended to the sky, 
And looked so cold up -there on high. 
The sun appeared beyond the hill, 
And shone upon my window sill, 
And soon its rays had set aflame 
The paintings on my window pane. 

Ann Guidoboni '54 



IF 

If turmoil could leave my soul at rest, and 

not fling 
Forgotten memories against my breast, 
Nor whisper coaxing words within my ear, 
I would not feel this frightening fear 
But see, instead, the hopeful spring 
Resplendent on a robin's wing. 

Karen S. Engstrom '54 



BEDTIME STORY 
I love a TV. mystery 
With villains cool and crafty — 
One that's full of thrills and chills 
In houses dark and drafty. 
Victims lying here and there. 
Heroes brave and bold; 
Grandma tied up in her chair, 
Her body growing cold. 
But when it's time to go to bed, 
I hate to climb the stair; 
For then each shadow frightens me 
And straightens out my hair. 

Carol Connelly '54 



THE CALM BEFORE 
THE STORM 

The waves, like tiny fingers, 

Gently caress the shore — 

Advancing, retreating. 

With tranquil serenity, 

Seeking to deceive us — 

Then suddenly, the storm clouds lower; 

Behold! the false calm changes; 

The waves dip and soar, 

For now the hoax is over, 

And the waves crash to the shore. 

Diana Silva '54 



SUNSET GOLD 

The day was nearly over, and the dying sun 

Send out its golden fingers to play along the shore. 

They stretched along the stoney beach 

And turned each tiny grain of sand 

To shimmering gold. 

And as they stretched still further out 

To touch the lighthouse top; and leave it 

Haloed with a glow of golden light, 

They brushed their gold dust o'er the caps 

Of the soft receding waves. 

And left their mark upon the stones 

Damp, glistening at the water's edge. 

Each swaying reed was touched; and terns 

And other nimble birds that played among the reeds 

Were caressed by the magic; and given 

Eyes and feet of gold. 

But then the sun drew back its playful fingers; 

And took its magic back; and left the shore 

Without its golden light; all grey and dead 

And colorless. 

Nancy Prindle '52 



SEA STORM 
The Storm 

The boats plow the water 
Fighting the sea, 
They keel in the breakers, 
And yearn to be free. 
They dip in the roughness, 
Their bows in the waves, 
And rise on the white caps 
Shunning their graves. 
Their bodies are wet 
From the salt of the sea. 
And they call as they ride, 
"Set us free; set us free!" 

The Calm 

Across the dark harbor, 

The slight stretching sand, 

Grows gold in the path 

Of a yellowing strand. 

The song of an elm tree, 

A rust'ling new psalm, 

Bids farewell to the charger, 

And welcomes the calm. 

The boats which have tossed now 

Stand proud on the sea, 

No longer they worry, 

Nor fight to be free. 

Their decks are all cleared 

For the bright sun to warm, 

How proud stand their masts, for 

They've ridden the storm. 

Sally Mandell '52 



THE JOYS OF SPRING 

I love the glories of the spring — 
Flowers, sunshine, and birds that sing; 
White, fluffy clouds in a sky of blue — 
Grass in the morning covered with dew. 
The pitter-patter of April showers, 
Gently awakening the earth and flowers, 
Oh, what joy does nature bring 
To everyone and everything! 

Cecilia Lillich '54 



MUSIC 

Fleeting fingers cross the Keys, 

And humble notes from deep within 

Rebound, releasing beautiful melodies; 

Bent bows and vibrant strings 

Draw lyric tones from violins — 

And clarinet trills 

Flutter like flags unfurled in the wind. 

There's music streaming through the air — 

Lofty tunes for us to share 

In the lilting land of music. 

Marilyn Rossi '54 




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BOYS' BASKETBALL 

First Row: George Clarke, Walter Nelson, Donald Reid, Philip Carletti, Raymond 
Bussolari, Captain; Brooks Johnson, Karl Anderson, Joseph Maguire. 

Second Row: Francis Vancini, Manager; David Mello, Frank Raymond, Paul Ferazzi, 
Michael Barrett, Wayne Caton, Robert Meller, Francis Merritt, Daniel Beaton, 
Donald Fantoni. 

Third Row: Mr. Hank Rogers, Coach; Alfred Vierra, Manager; Irving Wall, Ronald 
Ferioli, Donald Taub, Wallace Ruas, Robert Fraccolossi, Dennis Barrett, John Van- 
cini, Leo Cadorette. 



HOOPSTER HIGHLIGHTS 

On the 28th of December, Plymouth played its first game at Braintree. 
Here the Blue and White were confronted with a team of three games 
experience. This showed right away as the Plymouth players were obvi- 
ously nervous and shaky. But on the other hand, Braintree was a cool- 
headed, smooth-running team. They broke to a lead at the half and were 
never headed. Their lead however was threatened in the fourth period 
when Plymouth came to within three points of a tie. The final score was 
Braintree 44, Plymouth 38. Capt. Ray Bussolari was high scorer for 
Plymouth, making 17 points. 

On the 8th of January Plymouth went to Wareham. Here we found 
a very small floor and low ceiling. This plus the fact that Wareham had 
a good team put Plymouth at a definite disadvantage. Wareham broke 
out in front by two points at the half. During the third quarter Wareham 
made some uncanny shots from as far out as half floor; and despite the 
terrific efforts of Capt. Bussolari and Wayne Caton, the final score was 
58 to 52, Wareham on top. Bussolari was high scorer with 22. 

On Tuesday, the 15th of January, Plymouth went to Middleboro. At 
first the two teams seemed evenly matched. Then Plymouth got accli- 
mated to the small court and started to widen the margin. Capt. Bussolari 
was hitting at will, and Wayne Caton with his deadly one hand shots was 
hitting consistently. This game proved to be out of the ordinary in two 
ways. Once during the fourth period Plymouth had only four men on the 
floor. Then Don Reid made history. He scored the 99th and 100th points. 
The final score was Plymouth 105, Middleboro 67. High scorers for Ply- 
mouth were Capt. Bussolari with 30 and Wayne Caton with 20. 



Ld Colony League 

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ABINGTON 53-41 
HINGHAM 54-52 
WAREHAM 5252 
WHITMAN 74-32 
MIDDLE BORO 105-67 
WEyM0UTH4446 
ROCKLAND 59-53 
HINGHAM 53-50 
ABINGTON 82-39 k , 

_ WHITMAN 75-53 BusloLari Ander5on 
<55ch MIDDLEBORO 83-54 
Rogers WAREHAM 56-43 
TECH. ROCKLAND 66-56 BROCKTON 
TOURNEy ALUMNI 56-39 TOURNEy 

PI* PROVINCE TOWN PLV. CANTO* 

51-52 53-54 




On the 17th, Plymouth journeyed to Weymouth. Plymouth, because 
of its last two victories, was rather cocky. It was this, coupled with the 
aggressiveness of the Weymouth team, that proved disastrous. They burst 
out ahead with a big lead which at one time during the third quarter was 
only five points. But as Ray Bussolari fouled out, so went our faint hope 
of victory. The final score was 64 to 44 Weymouth winning. Our high 
scorer was Bussolari with 15 points. 

January 22 found the Blue and White playing host to Rockland. This 
was a game we sorely needed to build up our confidence and stay in con- 
tention for the league championship. Rockland was in the lead at the 
quarter, but at the half Plymouth was ahead by 4 points. We opened the 
gap to 10 points, but Rockland came back to within three points of a tie. 
But baskets by Caton, Anderson, Carletti and Bussolari lengthened the 
gap again to 7 points in the final minutes. The whistle ending this excit- 
ing contest found Plymouth on top with 59 points to Rockland's 53. Bus- 
solari scored 25 points and Caton 14. 

On January 25 Plymouth played host to Hingham. Just as in the 
previous encounter between these two clubs, the game was exciting; Hing- 
ham had the lead at the end of each period except the last. With about a 
minute to play Plymouth, having a one point lead, successfully "froze" 
the ball. On the last play of the game a Plymouth player was fouled un- 
intentionally and was awarded two free shots. The final score was Ply- 
mouth 53, Hingham 50. Capt. Bussolari was high scorer. 

February 5 Plymouth came back home to meet Middleboro in another 
onesided game. Plymouth, getting off to a slow start, soon found itself 
and scored almost at will despite the two platoon system used by Middle- 
boro. At the final whistle the scoreboard read 83 to 54 in favor of the 
home team. Capt. Bussolari was again high scorer. 

On February 8 Plymouth met Wareham, its only league conqueror. 
The game, needless to say, was exciting and rather nerve wracking. Ply- 
mouth jumped to a 14 point lead, which was whittled down to 9 points at 
the half. Wareham fought desperately and came to within 5 points of a 
tie. In the closing minutes of the game Wareham began to fold under 
the strain of the relentless attack of Plymouth, and as a result Plymouth 
opened up the margin. The final whistle found Plymouth the victor by a 
score of 50 to 43, and also leader in the league. 

February 12 the Blue and White hoopsters journeyed to Rockland. A 
victory here would clinch the Old Colony League Championship. The 
game was a thriller, with Rockland jumping to a six points lead. But 
Plymouth was determined, and fought its way back into the game. Early 
in the 3rd quarter Capt. Bussolari injured his knee, threatening a setback 
to the team. But his replacement was big Don Reid who, teamed with 
George Clarke, cleaned the backboards for a 66 to 56 victory. Plymouth 
was now the league champ; and Capt. Bussolari, despite his knee injury, 
was still high scorer with 16 points. 

On the 15th of February the Blue and White met the Alumni. The 
Grads, led by Joe Freitus, fought hard. But their lack of playing and 
practicing together showed up, and the score at the final whistle was 

The next game for the Blue and White was the 19th of February, 
when they met Canton, a team winless in 13 games. But Canton seemed 
to forget its past record and fought with the utmost persistance. The 
game was tied at the half. In the opening minutes of the 3rd period Ply- 
mouth jumped to a ten point lead, only to have it cut down to three at the 
beginning of the fourth period. With only five seconds left to play, Karl 
Anderson made a lightning attempt to put Plymouth one point ahead; but 
Canton threw the ball the length of the floor where it was shot for the 
winning point. The final score was Canton 54, Plymouth 53. This was 
quite an upset, with Wilson of Canton scoring 30 points and Capt. Bussol- 
ari scoring 20. 



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FOOTBALL TEAM 

First Row: Coach Mario Romano, Leonard Vaz, George Clarke, Carl Turini, Kenneth 
Reid, Wayne Caton, Brooks Johnson, Robert Morini, Steven Tavares, Walter Correa, 
Charles Gavoni, Joseph Mondeau, Philip Maini, Howard Wood, Harry Churchill, 
Richard Gonsalves, Coach Antone Spath. 

Second Row: Leo Caderette, Irving Wall, Daniel Beaton, Robert Gavoni, Philip Carletti, 
Donald Fantoni, Harley LeCain, Ronald Montanari, Donald Coombs, Allan Cotti, 
Dennis Barrett, Donald Taub, Richard Barufaldi, Charles Silva. 

Third Row: Ronald Caton, Robert Fraccalossi, David Maffini, George Arnold, Louis Cor- 
reia, Ira Carlin, Ronald Tavares, Richard Saunders, Wayne Wood, Paul Ferazzi, 
Ralph Willis, Paul Baratta, Louis Cappella. 



PIGSKIN PERFORMANCE 

On September 22, the Plymouth High eleven played its first game at 
Taunton against Coyle's well-drilled, smooth running team. With only 
a little over two weeks practice, we proved to be no match for Coyle. The 
score at the half was 13-0, Coyle on top. The second half proved to be 
much different with Coyle scoring virtually every time they were in pos- 
session of the ball. The final score was Coyle 41, Plymouth 0. 

On September 29, the Blue and White met Bridgewater at home. The 
first half was evenly played, both teams failing to score. But in the open- 
ing minutes of the third quarter Plymouth scored. By the time the game 
ended we had added two more touchdowns and two extra points. The 
score ended Plymouth 20, Bridgewater 0. 

October 9 found Plymouth playing host to Middleboro. The players 
were warned against the Middleboro backfield. But with Howie Wood 
leading the defense attack on the line and Wayne Caton in the backfield 
the visitors were stopped. Plymouth began rolling in the second half, 
scoring twice and adding an extra point. 

On October 20 Plymouth journeyed to Abington. Here the team seem- 
ed to bog down and couldn't get rolling. Abington scored and held the 
lead for the rest of the game. This was indeed a let-down as the Blue and 
White didn't resemble the team of the previous week. The score at the 
final whistle was a disappointing Abington 6, Plymouth 0. 



October 27 Plymouth went to Hingham. Here they met a strong and 
aggressive team which they held scoreless until the final minutes of the 
second period. Then Hingham scored with a pass into the end zone from 
the 10-yard line. Plymouth threatened twice but bogged down short of 
the goal. Hingham countered again in the last quarter. The final score 
was Hingham 13, Plymouth 0, but Hingham knew she had been in a game. 

November 3 Plymouth was host to New Bedford Vocational. The off- 
ence of both teams shadowed the defense. The score at the half was 19 to 
19. During the second half our defense tightened and stopped "Voc." But 
fumbles by Plymouth safely allowed them to score the winning touch- 
down. The final score was New Bedford Vocational 25, Plymouth 19. 

November 10 Plymouth played Barnstable, an undefeated team. Our 
defense held their powerful backfield in check, but fumbles again plagued 
us, enabling them to score two touchdowns before the first half ended. 
They added two more in the last half, and the final score was 26 to 0, 
Barnstable the winner. 

The season's record was two and six. Plymouth scored 52 points to 
her opponents' 105. The following accounted for some of the 52 points: 
Wayne Caton — 12 
Richard Gonsalves — 12 
Brooks Johnson — 18 
Donald Fantoni — 6 
Harry Churchill — 4 




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See Page 92 



BASKETBALL 





TRACK TEAM 

First Row: John Hathaway, Lawrence Mansfield, John Scheid, Robert Holton, Edmund 

Lopes, Lawrence Benassi, Alfred Tedeschi, Donald Weaver. 
Second Row: Robert Vandini, Lewis Bartlett, Robert Gunther, Roger Weaver, Francis 

Vancini, Wallace Crowell, John Packard, John Hanson, Richard Sturtevant, Donald 

Govoni, Richard Blaisdell. 




CROSS COUNTRY TEAM 

First Row: Donald Weaver, Alfred Tedeschi, John Hathaway, Lawrence Benassi, Rob- 
ert Holton, Lawrence Mansfield, Richard Blaisdell, Edmund Lopes. 

Second Row: Robert Vandini, Lewis Bartlett, Wallace Crowell, John Vancini, Richard 
Sturtevant, John Packard, Jack Scheid. 



CROSS COUNTRY 

In cross-country, unlike many other sports, the team with the fewer 
points wins. Plymouth High started its cross-country season October 8 
against Middleboro. The Blue and White came out on top by a score of 
15 to 40. On October 19 Plymouth journeyed to Brockton where it met a 
strong team and lost by two points. 

October 25, Plymouth again met Middleboro, and even with a Ply- 
mouth handicap, Middleboro was unable to match the talent of Holton, 
Lopes, Scheid, and Hathaway, and was again shut out 15 to 40. October 31 
Plymouth met New Bedford Vocational at New Bedford and, handicapped 
without Scheid, lost 32 to 25. 

Then, November 3 was the day of the state meet at Franklin Field 
where Eddie Lopes, a Sophomore, placed ninth in a field of over 100. Ply- 
mouth placed second in the Class B division with 151 points to Rockland's 
85. 

November 6, Rockland came to Plymouth where, Rockland, due to 
the brilliant running of Hoss, won 23 to 33. November 9, Plymouth played 
host to Weymouth at the new course at the Plymouth Country Club. The 
Blue and White found very little competition as Holton, Lopes, Mansfield, 
and Scheid placed 1, 2, 3, 4. The score was 17 to 46 in favor of P.H.S. 

November 13 was the date for the district meet at the Plymouth Coun- 
try Club where Hoss of Rockland again led his team to victory over Ply- 
mouth and the other competitors, Rockland scoring 24 points, Plymouth 
scoring 26, and Canton 73. 

Plymouth enjoyed a successful season losing two meets but winning 
four. This plus the excellent showing at the State meet and at the district 
meet proves the capability of our Coach Carlo Guidaboni and the willing- 
ness of the squad. 





CHEERLEADERS 



GIRLS' HOCKEY TEAM 

First Row: Sabra Carpenter, Donna Barufaldi, Patricia Smiley, Elaine Cavicchi, Rollene 

Zaniboni, Nancy Prindle. 
Second Row: Joan Carton, Manager; Audrey Verkade, Christine Brigida, Cleta LaRoc- 

que, Karen Engstrom, Mary Ellen Callahan, Constance Hadaway, Gail Borgatti, 

Patricia Baker, Manager. 
Third Row: Sally Eldredge, Carol Connelly, Marilyn Clarke, Nancy Maloni, Barbara 

Halunen, Helen Johnson, Claire Connelly. 



GIRLS' BASKETBALL TEAM 

First Row: Beverly Tassinari, Audrey Verkade, Donna Barufaldi, Elaine Cavicchi, Joan 
Fortini, Marguerite Holmes, Constance Hadaway, Nancy Prindle, Patricia Smiley. 

Second Row: Carol Connelly, Carolyn McCosh, Patricia Diozzi, Marilyn Rossi, Mary 
Ellen Callahan, Shirley Roncarati, Elizabeth Wood, Gail Borgatti, Patricia Baker. 

Third Row: Marilyn Clarke, Cleta LaRocque, Dolores Almeida, Claire Connelly, Nancy 
Maloni, Barbara Halunen, Christine Brigida, Miss Ardys Farnsworth. 



We LooK 

Forward 





Featuring 

DUNCAN HINES 

ICE CREAM 



LELAND'S RESTAURANT 



BEST WISHES 

to 

THE GRADUATES 

of 

1952 





COLD SPRING SCHOOL — Court St. Originally Erected in 1895 




COLD SPRING SCHOOL — Alden St. Erected 1951 



124 
Years 




Since 
1828 



pwmouth savims bxmc 

PLYMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS 



Best wishes to the 
Qraduating Class of 

195 



c v> 




6 - 8 Court St. 



SADpUJ'S. 

/oshion (enter 



-D- -D- -□- 

Shows the Newest in Misses', Women's and Children's Wear 




WATCHMAKERS and JEWELERS 

Keepsake Diamonds 
Hamilton — Elgin — Longines 

28 Main St. Plymouth 



PLYMOUTH LUMBER CO. 



BUILDING MATERIALS OF ALL KINDS 



Telephone 237 




PURITAN CLOTHING CO. 

'The Men's and Boys' Store of Plymouth" 



□ 

PURITAN TAILORING DEPT. 

TAILORS — CLEANERS — FURRIERS 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

CAPPANNARI BROS. 



Cape Insurance Agency 

Amedeo V. Sgarzi Orfeo H. Sgarzi 

Enrico Ferrari 



INSURANCE 

for Everything Insurable 

4 Court St. Plymouth, Mass. 

Tel. 66 



Zanello Furniture Co. 

Electrical Appliances — Furniture 
Custom Upholstering 



84 Court St. 



Tel. 1485 



Walter S. Pearson 

JEWELER 

Watches — Diamonds 
Fine Repairing 

62 Court St. Plymouth, Mass. 



Compliments 
of 



l/I' 



'4 MAIN ST. XtiaZgrwrn Ogena^ TEL.2055 



THIS MARK 



DESIGNED f PRINTED 




MtD l«)> 



Is your guarantee of . . . 
SATISFACTORY work by 

a 12 5 year old firm financ- 
ially strong with a record of 
Successful performance. 



To the Class of 1952 

Very Best Wishes 

for A 
Successful Future 



OLD COLONY 

and PLYMOUTH 

THEATRES 




PLYMOUTH CORDAGE COMPANY 

PLYMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS 

Established 1824 



ROPE - BALER TWINE - BINDER TWINE - TYING TWINE - TWISTED PAPER 






ESTABLISHED '803 



The Plymouth National Bank 

Plymouth. Massachusetts 



Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



Congratulations 
to the 



SENIOR CLASS 



Ellis Curtain Company, Inc. 

Plymouth, Mass. 



Curtain Manufacturers 



NEW YORK 



BOSTON 



CHICAGO 



Best Wishes to Class of '52 

BAILEY MOTOR SALES, Inc. 

Telephone 1090 
BUICK and PONTIAC SALES and SERVICE 



-D- 



114 Sandwich Street 



Plymouth, Mass. 



Plymouth Federal 
Savings and Loan Association 

PLYMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS 
Inc. 1882 Fed. 1937 



President 
James R. Chandler 

Vice President 
Harry R. Talbot 



Executive Vice President 
Robert J. Tubbs 

Treasurer and Secretary 
Walder J. Engstrom 



Assistant Treasurers 
A. Lee Roulston Fred C. Brown 

Assistant Secretary 
Mae E. Emond 



♦ ■■ ..■: ■ 



... 




Our new home at Court and Russell Sts. will be 
ready to receive you this summer. 

At Your Service For 
INSURED SAFETY FOR SAVINGS 

HOME MORTGAGES LOANS PLANS 
Planned for Your Budget 



Compliments of 

The North Plymouth 

Merchants Displaying 

This Seal 




Compliments of 




Congratulations 
to the 


J. W. BRENNER & SON 




Senior Class 


Wallpaper — Paints 




HOLMES AND YOUNG 


Artists' Supplies 




CATERING SERVICE 


8 Samoset St. Tel. Ply. 1132 




Carver, Mass. 


COOPER DRUG CO. 

Incorporated 

Prescriptions Carefully Compounded 

DRUGS — CANDY — CIGARS 




Compliments of 

Plymouth Rock Joint Board 

Textile Workers Union 
of America, C. I. O. 


TOBACCO 




Farl R. Harper — President 


HENDREE'S ICE CREAM 

(In Seven Flavors) 




Robert Tassinari — 1st Vice-Pres. 
Lawrence Mossey — 2nd Vice-Pres. 
Arrigo Ferioli — Rec. Sec. 


In Orafs — If It's Bexsil — It's Bight 




Theodore Filteau, Man. 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

JO/7 


/five 


4 

CENTS 


SAVINGS 


BANK 


/HCOAfOAATlO /SSS 


PLYMOUTH MASSACHUSETTS 



Compliments of 

MORSE & SHERMAN 

WM. J. SHARKEY 
Court Street Plymouth 


BEST WISHES 

TO THE CLASS OF '52 

THE YARN SHOP 


C. PAUL 

52 Court St. 


PLYMOUTH SUPPLY CO. 

Plumbing - Heating - Electrical Supplies 
39 Court St., Plymouth Tel. 1423 


Compliments of 

HERB ERSKINE 

PLYMOUTH GLASS CO. 


Best Wishes to Class of 1952 
THOMAS R. HOGAN 


CAPEWAY SERVICE STATION 

118 SANDWICH ST. 

Phone - 275 

Congratulations to Senior Class 


Compliments of 
ALDEN HOUSE 

Upholsterers — Decorators 
44 Court St.. Plymouth — Tel. 1575 


Compliments of 

TAVERNELLI'S BARBER SHOP 

Soares and Ottani, Proprietors 


Compliments 
of 

SCUDDER COAL & OIL CO. 



TOWN BROOK SERVICE STATION 

(flflfc) Mando's 

International Sales and Service 

. . . 24-Hour Road Service . . . 
14 Water Street Plymouth 820-W 




Compliments 

to the Class 

of 1952 

from 

WALK-OVER SHOE STORE 
65 Main St. — Plymouth 



Some of Our Lines Include 

Stride Rites — Hill and Dale — Bass 
Enna-Jettick — Walk-Over — Foot-Delights 
Bostonians — Penaljo's — Mansfields 
Walk-Overs — Stetson — Arnold — Physical Culture 
Peter Rabbits — Buskins — Cabblers 



Compliments 
of 



PIOPPI'S GRILL 



Compliments of 



C. P. WASHBURN CO. 



GRAIN, LUMBER & PLUMBING 



PLYMOUTH MOTORS 

SALES and SERVICE 

Kaiser * Frazer * Henry J. 

Water Street 
Tel. 1800 



THE ROGERS PRINT 

Complete Printing Service 

20 Middle St. Tel. 165-M 

Plymouth, Mass. 



Best Wishes 
To the Senior Class 

COLONIAL 
DINER 




PRINTERS and LITHOGRAPHERS 

..EYDEN PRESS 9 TOWN SQ - PLYMOUTH. MASS. 

"COMPLETE PRINTING — INCLUDING LAYOUT & FINISHED ART WORK' 



Printers of this Publication 



TEL. 775 



SAMOSET GARAGE INC. 


CHRYSLER — PLYMOUTH 


We Buy and Sell 


Sales and Service 


Good Used Cars 


Best Wishes to Class of '52 


WOOD'S FISH MARKET 

RALPH F. GOODWIN, PROP. 


PLYMOUTH ROCK HOTEL 


FRESH, SALTED AND SMOKED FISH 


Good Food Moderate Prices 


Crabmeat, Scallops, Lobsters, Oysters and Clams 
Telephone 261 Plymouth 


Compliments of 


Compliments of 


PLYMOUTH HOME 


BELL SHOPS 


& AUTO STORE 


12 Court St. 


35 Main St. Tel. 525 


Plymouth, Mass. 


PLYMOUTH ROCK GROCERY 


Compliments of 


Phone 1198 117 Sandwich Street 

Free Delivery 


MANOMET LUMBER CO. 


Best Wishes 
DEXTER'S SHOE STORE 

Footwear for 

THE ENTIRE FAMILY 

Tel. 165-W 16 Court St. 


HATCH ELECTRIC CO. 

12 Market St. 
Plymouth, Mass. 


Telephone 825 


P. O. Box 356 


BLISS HAR1 


DWARE CO. 


• Locksmiths 


• Toridheet 


• Builders' Hardware 


• Oil Burners 


• Mechanics' Tools 


• Plumbing — Heating 


• Pittsburg Paints 


• Sheet Metal Work 


• Electrical Supplies 


• Furnaces — Boiler: 


• Housewares 


• Shell Fuel Oil 



SHIRETOWN MOTORS INC. 



Sales 



iSfcWtf 



Service 



Water Street 



Phone 1407 



Plymouth 



THEO. THOMAS 

No. Carver Tel. Carver 16-2 

Specializing in Sale of 
CRANBERRY BOGS 



DELANO & KEITH 

CIVIL ENGINEERS and SURVEYORS 

3A Main Street 



Compliments of 

GELLAR STATION 

Manomet Mass. 



Best Wishes 
to the Senior Class 

PECK - GARRITY 

Hugh L. Garrity .Funeral Service 



LEADING SHOE STYLES 

For Dress, Casual or Sportwear 

• 

HOSIERY — HANDBAGS 

All at Popular Prices 
CATERING TO TEEN-AGERS 



Compliments 
of 

BARBDERTS MARKET 
Jabez Corner Tel. 258 

• 

Quality Meats & Groceries 


PLYMOUTH ROCK 
CLEANERS 

"The Place with Parking Space" 

Water St. - Opp. State Pier 
Phone 1744 

JACK OTTINO -- ALFRED VOLTA 


TOWN SHOE SERVICE 

63 % Main St. 
Plymouth, Mass. 


Compliments of 

WARD & BRADY 

SIGNS 


S. LEONARDI 

PIONEER FOOD STORE 

Meats, Groceries, and Provisions 
289 Court cor. Castle St. Tel. 53 


COMPLIMENTS OF 
A. K. FINNEY 


ERNEST BOTIERI 

WATCHMAKER & JEWELER 

290A Court St. 

No. Plymouth, Mass. 

We carry a complete line of Hamilton, 

Waltham & Bulova Watches. 


Compliments of 

PRIMO'S SERVICE STATION 

Primo Zucchelli 
Plymouth, Macs. 


Compliments of 

PLYMOUTH BAKING CO. 

Bread, Rolls, Doughnuts, 

Cake, Pies, and Cookies, 

Birthday Cakes 


Best Wishes 

from 

McLELLAN'S 

5* — $1.00 
SCHOOL NEEDS 


THE HOBSHOLE HOUSE 

An Inn With Early American Charm 

212 Sandwich St. Tel. 1153-W 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis J. O'Neill 


KINGSTON LUMBER CO. 

"Buy Where The Builders Buy" 
^^^0*^~\ Complete Line of 

^^^ Building Materials 
^^Spll Modene Paint 


14 Main Street No. Plymouth 
Tel. Plymouth 1665 



Nook Farm 




MILK 



and 



CREAM 



HEALTH BUILDER 



LOCAL MILK 



Nook Road 



Plymouth 



Telephone PLYMOUTH 1261 



COMPLIMENTS OF 
DUTTON MOTOR CAR CO. 

115 Sandwich Street 
PLYMOUTH 

OLDSMOBILE -•- CADILLAC 


H. A. BRADFORD & SONS 

Distributor for 

S. S. PIERCE 
Specialties 

1 Warren Ave. Plymouth 
Telephone 1298-W 


Your Search for Furniture 

Is Not Complete 

Until You Have Shopped 

GOGGIN and SON 
11 Court St. 


SOUTH 

STREET 

GARAGE 

STUDEBAKER SALES $ SERVICE 
Tel. 269-W Plymouth. Mass. 


For the Values in Real Estate 

and for Insurance That 

Really Covers Your Losses 

Apply to 

Walter V. Schroeder 

Real Estate & Insurance 
18 Main St. Ext. 
Plymouth, Mass. 


Hr ^t |b 7P lESSofl 
V ■■■v. • ■ 


JOHN E. JORDAN CO. 

Plymouth, Massachusetts 
Tel. 283 



Northeastern University 



MEN AND WOMEN ADMITTED TO ALL COURSES 

* College of Liberal Arts 

* College of Engineering 

* College of Business Administration 
School of Law (Day and Evening) 

School of Business (Evenings) 
College of Liberal Arts (Evenings) 

ALL CURRICULA OFFER BROAD TRAINING FOR LIVING 
AND EARNING A LIVELIHOOD 

Registration 

Early in September — Early application is necessary 



CO-OPERATIVE PLAN 



SCHOLARSHIPS 



SELF-HELP OPPORTUNITIES 



FOR CATALOG — MAIL THIS COUPON AT ONCE 
NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

Director of Admissions 
Boston 15, Massachusetts 



Please send me a catalog of the 

□ College of Liberal Arts □ 

□ College of Engineering □ 

□ College of Business Administration □ 

□ School of Law □ 

□ Evening School of Business □ 



Name 

Address. 
51-74 



(Street) 



(City or Town) 



Evening — College of Liberal Arts 
Day Pre-Medical Program 
Day Pre-Dental Program 
Day Pre-Legal Program 
Evening Pre-Legal Program 



(P. 0. NumeiaU) 



(State) 




ICE CREAM 

Favorably Known for 67 Years and Still in a Class 

By Itself 

"Made For Particular People" 

131 Eliot Street Milton 87, Mass. 

BLuehills 8-7850 
10% Nelson Street Plymouth, Mass. 

Plymouth 160 



CLOUGH'S MARKET 

Tel. 459 84 Summer St. 



Congratulations to the 
Senior Class 

SARACCA'S NEWS STORE 

36 SANDWICH ST. 

Tel. 2284 



Best Wishes 

to the 

Class of 1952 

SNUG HARBOR MOTORS 

Tel. Dux. 51 Duxbury, Mass. 



For A Quick Meal or Snack 
Stop at 

DAN'S DINER 

Main St. Ext. Tel. 1906 



Tel. 30 Notary Public 

STODDARD & TALBOT 

"Insurance That Insures" 
Harry R. Talbot 

Attorney-at-Law Plymouth, Mass. 

Managing Underwriter 



LINOLEUM 



TILES 



'Ztetvuf't 'purutitune &x. 

Tel. 1118 

WESTINGHOUSE APPLIANCES 

40 COURT ST. PLYMOUTH, MASS. 



Best Wishes 
from 

JABEZ COR. SERVICE STA. 

Warren Ave. Tel. 161 



Best Wishes to 
Class of 1952 

KENT'S BEAUTY SALON 

19 Court St. Plymouth, Mass. 

Room 9 Tel. Ply. 794 



MIDDISHADE CLOTHES 



MANHATTAN SPORTSWEAR 



PLYMOUTH MEN'S SHOP 

DISTINCTIVE MENSWEAR 
18 MAIN STREET, PLYMOUTH 



MALLORY HATS 



HOLEPROOF HOSIERY 



HENRY MENGOLI & SON 


Plumbing and Heating Contractors 


-•- 


AIR-CONDITIONING 


DELCO OIL BURNERS 


BEST WISHES 


Compliments 
of 


to 


SWEETSER'S GENERAL 
STORE 


To the Class of 1952 


Duxbury Tel. 15 


EDES MANUFACTURING 
COMPANY 








/piwvouTH. /*VASS eST.iWO 




Plymouth, Mass. 


"Fifty Years of Serving Plymouth" 




61 and 63 Main Street 



Compliments of the 

PEPSI-COLA BOTTLING CO. 

124 SANDWICH ST. 
PLYMOUTH, MASS. 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

REGINALD MAROIS 


Best Wishes from 

WALTER CARMICHIAL 

Carver, Mass. 


Compliments of 

GULF TWINS SERVICE STATION 

Corner of Court & Samoset Sts. 

Clifton MacDonald 

Paul Scheid Tel. 2140 


Compliments of 

PLYMOUTH ROCK HARDWARE 

62 Court St. Phone 951 


BEST WISHES 
from 

ROGERS STORE 

MANOMET 


GAMBINI'S 

AIR-CONDITIONED 

LUNCHEONETTE 
Tel. 372 52 Main St. 


Compliments of 

ALFRED CROSS 

CROSS CONSTRUCTION CO. 
287 Court St. 


Compliments of 

SEARS, ROEBUCK & CO. 

ORDER OFFICE 


Best Wishes 

to 
Senior Class 

EGAN CHEVROLET COMPANY 

120 Sandwich St. Plymouth 

PARTS • SALES • SERVICE 



Compliments of 

FORN SIGN CO. 

Est. 1919 

NEON SIGNS 

SALES — SERVICE — MAINTENANCE 

ERECTION 

LETTERING OF ALL KINDS 

TRUCK & AUTO SPRAYING 
Tel. Plymouth 33 

315 Court St. Plymouth 


GOODING'S 

JEWELERS 

Diamonds Silver 

Est. 1802 

ELGIN - GRUEN - HAMILTON 
Expert Clock & Watch Repairing 
Tel. 429 Plymouth 18 Court St. 

CREDIT - BUDGET - TERMS 


Compliments of 
GINO'S SERVICE STATION 

GINO R. FECI 


BEST WISHES 

DEMPSEY'S STORE 

CARVER, MASS. 


Compliments of 

OLD COLONY LAUNDRY 
of Plymouth 

Master Launderers — Dry Cleaners 
18 Howland St. 


Best of Luck 

HOLMES GROCERY 

87 Sandwich Street 


ELIZABETH M. FOSTER 

BEAUTY SHOP 

Room 10 Bnttner Bldf. 

PLYMOUTH 


Furniture — Bedding — Floor Covering 

MITCHELL-THOMAS CO. Inc. 
PLYMOUTH, MASS. 

Frank A. Mitchell Tel. 76 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

SEARS FUEL 
COMPANY 


House t? Blue Blinds 

GRACE & MARION GOODRICH 

In our homey dining-rooms and 

attractive screened terrace 

Unusual gifts in our 'Tetite Gift Shop" 

(Closed Monday) 
No. 7 on Historic North St. Plymouth 


"That Distinctive Store of Plymouth" 

GEORGE V. BUTTNER 
STORE 

Plymouth's Most Modern Store 
For Ladies, Misses and Children 

Tel. 290 19-21 Court St. 
PLYMOUTH 


Compliments of 

ANTFS TAILOR SHOP 

— Formal Wear — 
Cleaning — Tailoring — Dyeing 



Compliments 
of 

Mario's 
Auto Body Shop 

Mario E. Traverso, Proprietor 

112—114 Sandwich Street 
Rear Bailey Motor Sales Inc. 




CONGRATULATIONS 

TO THE 

CLASS OF 1952 



Richard Blaisdell is having his insurance program analyzed at the 

ELMER E. AVERY INSURANCE AGENCY Inc. 

Founded 1890 
7 TOWN SQUARE 



D. B. Avery — P. F. Bechard — W. E. Green 



Telephone 1187-W 

Jtm'ss ftestaurant 

REGULAR DINNERS 
A LA CARTE SERVICE 
Shore Dinners Our Specialty 

5 to 1 1 MAIN ST. Plymouth, Mass. 


ALAN HEY'S 

Plumbing & Heating 

Wishes to extend its 

congratulations to the 

graduating class 

180 Court St. Tel. 24-W 


PARK AVE. SERVICE STATION 

Socony — Vacuum Products 

Cor. Court and No. Park Ave. 
Phone 1550 


BEST WISHES 
to the Class of 1952 

WRIGHTS GREENHOUSES 

Tel. 543 Kingston 


Compliments of 

CARL TASSINARI 
Incorporated 


LINCOLN ST. SERVICE STATION 

S*jT\ CHARLES CABAFOU 

Hmrjjr) Cor. LINCOLN & SANDWICH STS. 
\^%/ Phone 2009 Plymouth, Man. 


Compliments of 

SOUTH CENTRE MARKET 


Compliments 
PLYMOUTH ROCK ALLEYS 


Congratulations to the 
Senior Class 

KEATING BROS. 
REPAIR & SERVICE STATION 

No. Carver, Mass. 


EMERSON'S VARIETY STORE 

WHITE HORSE BEACH 

MASS. 


KAY'S CUT-RATE 

Lowest Prices 'in Town 

PATENT MEDICINES 
COSMETICS 

Corner North St. 67 Main St. 


ARONS FURNITURE CO. 

R 18 Middle St. Tel. Ply. 25 
O Everything - For 
N The - Home 
S 



KINGSTON. MASS. 



BEST WISHES 

TO THE 
SENIOR CLASS 



/• 



S&Cfrfztf '<* * 



A snack or a meal — 



TEL. 373 



CONGRATULATIONS 
TO THE CLASS OF 1952 

M & M SPORTING GOODS CO. 



Tel. 1915 



25 Main St. 



PATRONS 



Dr. Victor V. Ragonetti 
Dr. George P. Canucci 
Dr. T. W. Loft 
Dr. E. Harold Donovan 



Dr. James A. McDade 
Dr. M. A. Policow 
Dr. G. H. Jackson 
Dr. Samuel Swartz 



Dr. and Mrs. Wilfred E. Cohen 
Dr. and Mrs. William A. Potter, Jr. 



OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS 






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Friends in 
need are 
friends 
indeed. 



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